DROUGHT TAKES TOLL: The Lederhoses are calling for agistments to house their cattle this winter. Pictured here is Eddie Lederhose and woofer Montain putting out mineral blocks, which help cattle digest dry grass at Lederville, their property in Tenterfield.
DROUGHT TAKES TOLL: The Lederhoses are calling for agistments to house their cattle this winter. Pictured here is Eddie Lederhose and woofer Montain putting out mineral blocks, which help cattle digest dry grass at Lederville, their property in Tenterfield. CONTRIBUTED

Farmers go to desperate measures to save their cattle

ONE Tenterfield couple are about to "lose it all” unless they find temporary paddocks on the North Coast to save their cattle this winter.

Like most places west of the range, the drought has had a devastating affect on Lederville, a cattle property on the Rocky River owned by Eddie and Zoe Lederhose.

Mr Lederhose described their paddocks as "bare and barren” and their main source of water, the Rocky River, "reduced to puddles, surrounded by burnt grass”.

"The river has never run dry before, that's why it's known as Timmbarra, the river that never stops flowing,” Mr Lederhose said.

"Our herd of beautiful Brangus cattle and Australian stock horses, that have taken us so many years to selectively breed, are now at risk.

"We desperately need to find agistments for about another 250 of our Brangus cows or they will starve this winter.

"We are not prepared to see our beautiful breeders go for nothing to the abattoir and are appealing for any assistance short or long term, small medium or large agistments for our lovely quiet mumma cows.” 

Due to lack of feed and water, Mr Lederhose said the cattle market had completely crashed all through the western country.

"A steer at a recent sale, which cost $40 to transport from the farm to the sale, sold for $12,” he said.

"We've put a big chunk of our lifetime into raising up this line of Brangus cattle - to sell them now for nothing would be devastating.”

"It's not just us, a lot of our friends out here that are in the same boat. If we find extra land from this we will coordinate helping these people out and passing information onto them too. "

Mr Lederhose explained some of the benefits of grazing cattle on your land.

"It can improve land condition, soil structure and cattle can rid of some rubbish that grows out of control,” he said.

The Lederhoses are willing to rebuild fences, or provide portable fences, and have their own truck to cart cattle back and forth.

"Mobile steel yards are transportable, can be moved from paddock to paddock, making small blocks usable,” he said.

"We need help and will pay well for the use of someone's grass.”

Contact the Lederhoses on 0428 030 889 or 6737 6829.

 

 

 

 



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