The sixth sense debunked by Australian university

EVER wondered if you have a sixth sense?

Well wonder no more, as a study by the University of Melbourne has claimed it has debunked the myth of "extrasensory perception".

The study, published on Tuesday in journal PLOS ONE, found that while there was no such thing as a sixth sense, people could reliably sense when a change had occurred, even if they did not see it happen.

Lead researcher Dr Piers Howe said the research was the first to reveal people could reliably sense changes that they could not visually identify.

But he said despite the "common belief" of a sixth sense, it was, rather, dependent on the five actual human senses; sight, sound, touch, smell and taste.

"We were able to show that while observers could reliably sense changes that they could not visually identify, this ability was not due to extrasensory perception or a sixth sense," he said.

The study analysed the reactions of people to pairs of colour photographs of a woman, with some pictures having a slight change in her appearance.

Results of the study found participants did know a change had occurred, "without being able to visually identify the change", but detecting such changes were not the result of a "sixth sense".



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