A still from the 2009 big-budget thriller 2012, in which the earth’s core heats up, causing massive earthquakes and tsunamis that wipe out a huge percentage of the population.
A still from the 2009 big-budget thriller 2012, in which the earth’s core heats up, causing massive earthquakes and tsunamis that wipe out a huge percentage of the population. Contributed

Enjoy your (final?) new year

YOU should make the most of New Year's Eve celebrations this year, they could be your last.

At least that's what many conspiracy theorists would have us believe - that the world as we know it will end in 2012.

They're not the first to predict the Earth's demise but more than one theory is flooding the internet which predicts cataclysmic or transformative events in 2012.

The theories are so popular that in 2009 Hollywood made a summer-hit movie, aptly named 2012, which stars John Cusack, Danny Glover and Woody Harrelson.

One theory, known as the Mayan Prophecy, predicts a "transformative shift" when the calendar of the Mayan civilisation reaches a turning point in their calendar similar to the one we reached in 2000.

That will occur on about December 21.

December 21 is also the Earth's end date according to those who believe it marks the completion of a 26,000 year celestial cycle, known as the Precession of the Equinoxes.

According to the theory, the solstice on December 21 is a unique moment when the equators of the earth, the sun and the Milky Way all fall into alignment.

Apparently, "geomagnetic reversal" will occur and the north and south poles will switch, plunging the world into chaos.

Other theorists believe a rogue planet, known as Planet X, Eris or Nibiru, which supposedly orbits the sun every 3600 years, will enter the inner solar system resulting in a massive solar flare which is also expected to cause "geomagnetic reversal" which will destroy the world.

But of course Tim Mandham, spokesman for the Australian Sceptics, thinks all the theories are nonsense and predicts the world will carry on.

"We take it so seriously we have offered people a refund on their subscriptions if the world ends," Mr Mandham said with a laugh.

"It's a serious offer."

"Funnily enough end of the world theories have all proved to be incorrect and, funnily enough, we are still here.

"But I can guarantee that when 2012 passes the end of the world proponents will say there was a miscalculation and they will point to a new date.

"It is the whole nature of conspiracy theories that when you deny something you are part of the conspiracy," he said.



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