IT’S BACK: For the first time since the 2012 Woodburn storm, there have been signs of the endangered north coast emu returning to Bungawalbin.
IT’S BACK: For the first time since the 2012 Woodburn storm, there have been signs of the endangered north coast emu returning to Bungawalbin. Jimmy Malecki

Endangered emus return after Woodburn storm

LANDHOLDERS have found signs that an endangered emu population has returned to Bungawalbin for the first time since the 2012 Woodburn storm.

Just two weeks after the completion of a significant Landcare revegetation program, evidence has been found that the north coast emu has returned to the region.

The emus belong to an isolated population, thought to number less than 120, based on community surveys conducted between 2000 and 2010.

The $52,000 six-month Landcare project, which involved five local landholders, Northern Landcare Support Services, EnviTe, NR Fire and Biodiversity Consortium, delivered almost instant results.

Bungawalbin landholder Jimmy Malecki said that within two weeks of the completion of clearing of a 1.6m track, the first sighting of coastal emu scats were found on his property since 2012.

"It just goes to show that this stuff works and funding needs to continue," he said.

Bush regenerators undertook weed control, removing infestations of cat's claw creeper, lantana and other environmental weeds such as corky passion vine.

Fire trails have been cleared and fencing has been removed from one property to allow the existing emu population to move across the landscape to access food and mates.



"Someone could have been injured or killed"

premium_icon "Someone could have been injured or killed"

An RFS crew sheltered in their truck as the grass fire overcame them

How this Ballina mum juggles kids and a thriving business

premium_icon How this Ballina mum juggles kids and a thriving business

"Kids are amazing but... having a passion is fulfilling as well”

Local Partners