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Heartbroken mum remembers 'energetic' boy after Taipan bite

TRYING HARD: Eli Giles, 2, with his mum Brittany at the Lady Cilento Children's Hospital.
TRYING HARD: Eli Giles, 2, with his mum Brittany at the Lady Cilento Children's Hospital.

IT WILL take more than three near-fatal bites from Australia's third deadliest snake to break this Agnes Water family.

Two-year-old Eli Campbell, now in rehabilitation at Lady Cilento Children's Hospital, is continuing his brave battle after he was bitten by a taipan three times on September 26.

>>'I fell apart': Dad heart broken after Taipan blinds toddler

The Agnes Water boy is relearning how to live, from sitting up straight to swallowing.

Parents Giles Campbell and Brittany Cervantes have been amazed each day by the strength of their little boy as they learn to live with his potential lifelong brain injury.

In an update from the parents on a GoFundMe Page created for the family, they said the next step was for Eli to gain strength and control of his head and neck muscles.

"Giles and I are constantly battling memories of the past of our energetic, playful, hilarious, sensitive but strong little boy," Brittany wrote.

>>One tip that will person's a child's life after a snake bite

"They creep up on us at times during his sessions when we see our boy limp in someone's arms as they carry him from bed to his stroller and while songs are being sung that he would normally sing along to.

"I trust that there is fight in Eli, Giles and I see glimpses of our boy in that little body every day."

AS IT HAPPENED | 

>>Toddler rushed to hospital after taipan bite

>>'Strong little man': Mum's brain injury fears for Taipan victim

A GoFundMe has been set up for Agnes Water toddler, Eli, after being bitten by coast taipan. Photo Contributed
A GoFundMe has been set up for Agnes Water toddler, Eli, after being bitten by coast taipan. Photo Contributed Contributed

Now in his second week of rehabilitation, they have already seen some improvement in his abilities.

To improve his strength Eli has to sit upright, supported, for at least 30 minutes twice a day.

"His movements have increased over the last few days from only touching things to full-on squeezing, rolling a ball up his chest, and even strummed the music therapist's guitar.

>>OPINION: One death too many! Snake catchers should kill

"After seeing that Eli could tolerate spending some time in this new position, he was given a stroller with supports.

"This meant we could now go for walks when he wasn't in session. The first couple of days in the stroller took some getting used to for Eli.

"It's in this chair we see the most smiles and hear the most giggles!"

During his rehabilitation Brittany and Giles saw their son's pupils constrict for the first time since the accident.

WATCH | COASTAL TAIPAN STRIKES | 

 

 

His eyesight has been one of the biggest concerns for doctors.

"It was beautiful to see his eyes again.

"The optometrist said his eyes are healthy, we are just seeing the effects of his brain injury.

"He responds to bright lights, turns his head away and squints."

As doctors continue to monitor his condition, they said the extent of his brain injury and damage to his eyesight were not yet clear.

The Agnes Water community, and Australia, is continuing to support the family with more than $60,000 donated for his rehabilitation and travel and accommodation costs.

If you would like to help the family, click here

Topics:  editors picks gladstone lady cilento children's hospital snake bite taipan



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