Dieter Horstmann, from Tyagarah, with his Polish-manufactured Vectrix electric motorbike.
Dieter Horstmann, from Tyagarah, with his Polish-manufactured Vectrix electric motorbike. The Northern Star

Electric motorcycle is a clean, green alternative

AN electric motorbike that costs around 63 cents to charge and goes from zero to 80km/h in six-and-a-half seconds is here.

The bike is owned by Byron Shire identity Dieter Horstmann, and is one of the first to be registered in Australia.

The electric engine is charged by plugging it into a standard 240 volt power supply. The bike itself produces no CO2 emissions.

Mr Horstmann is planning to generate renewable energy at his Tyagarah property to make it totally carbon-free. The number plate on his bike is 'NOC-02'. “Electric cars and bikes are the future,” he said.

“The piston engine has been in development for 50 years. In only three years the hybrid engines in Toyotas have halved in weight and doubled in power.”

The motorbike is manufactured in Poland by a company called Vectrix and costs a little under $15,000.

Mr Horstmann estimated his total fuel costs would be around $50 a year for electricity, and that the bike would generate zero emissions if charged with 'green power'.

More information about the Vectrix electric motorbike

The most surprising thing about the bike is that it is almost totally silent when running. “People are surprised when you come up behind them because you don't make a noise,” he said.

Mr Horstmann said he had been riding motorbikes all his life and described the Vectrix as 'fun' to ride.

The battery takes about two-and-a-half hours to charge and will travel about 100 kilometres before it needs to be recharged.

It will reach a top speed of a little over 100km/h.

“It will go 105 up a steep hill. It's very different to a piston engine. It gets very high torque in a short time,” he said.

Mr Horstmann saw the bike on the Internet and tried one when he was in Germany.

“There is no other bike like this available. It is the first of its kind,” he said proudly.

He said battery technology would be replaced by fuel cells in the future, allowing electric engines to travel much further.



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