A PASSIONATE MAN: Doug Hogan pictured in the 1970s in the Station Hotel, South Lismore.
A PASSIONATE MAN: Doug Hogan pictured in the 1970s in the Station Hotel, South Lismore. Jacklyn Wagner

Doug, 91: driven to succeed

FROM TRAVELLING to cricket on horseback, to pouring beers as the state's longest serving publican, to his prized Rhode Island Red fowls, Doug Hogan packed a lot into his 91 years.

The passionate fisherman died on December 23 of complications that arose from a cut on his leg he suffered while fishing at Ballina with good mate John Foster.

The son of Charles and Ellen Hogan, Douglas Lindsay Hogan was born on September 27, 1921 and spent his early years learning the workings of the family's dairy farm, Lindsay View from his father.

Doug Hogan's daughter Barbara and son-in-law Ray Murphy said Doug was a passionate, driven man who was determined to succeed at everything he did.

"Dad was always there to help us; he would do anything for his family," Barbara said.

"He was a passionate man who loved his chooks, fishing, sport and he played cricket, tennis, table tennis and bowls."

Ray said Doug's life changed when, in 1966, after running successful beer booths at local shows, he became the publican and went on to purchase the Station Hotel at South Lismore.

His 60-plus year interest in his Rhode Island Red chooks took Mr Hogan around the world and saw him win hundreds of ribbons, trophies and certificates at poultry shows.

"One of Doug's real passions was his poultry. He was one of Australia's leading Rhode Island Red breeders," Mr Murphy said.

A pillar in the Lismore community, Doug was patron of more than 10 sporting associations including the North Coast Cricket Council, the Lismore District Cricket Association and the City Bowling Club.

Friend of almost 40 years and fishing mate John Foster said Doug was a strong willed man whose family came first. "His family and his grandkids always came first, then running the pub and his chooks would have been number two and fishing and playing cards was his leisure time," he said.

Mr Hogan had managers in the hotel in the latter years, but Barbara said he was in control of the business until he died. His grandson Jeremy Williams continues to manage the hotel as he has done for the past two years.

Mr Hogan is survived by his daughter Barbara, her husband Ray, his nine grandchildren and 22 great-grandchildren.



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