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Don't Misc this

Southern Cross University students Paul Tran, left, and Ben Avery with Ben’s artwork, Toxic.
Southern Cross University students Paul Tran, left, and Ben Avery with Ben’s artwork, Toxic. Cathy Adams

AN underwater toxic jellyfish book and Vietnamese-inspired tattoo designs will be in royal company on the first level of the Gollan Hotel tonight.

They are in the same area where a young Queen Elizabeth II and Prince Phillip stayed overnight on their only visit to Lismore in 1954.

MISC, an exhibition of students' designs, showcases digital art and design work done at Southern Cross University.

The students were yesterday putting the finishing touches to their work before the opening of MISC; a fitting title for the miscellaneous exhibit which includes a history of tattoos with a personal touch, original T-shirt, parasail and upholstery designs, and street art superimposed over buildings to reveal their potential in urban development.

Ben Avery said he and his fellow students were feeling the pressure.

"It's not done. I still have to add some stuff," he said.

"It's hard to get people to experience your art the way you want it to be experienced, but we'll have it done by the opening."

Mr Avery, who plans to work as an artist, said his inspiration came from jellyfish.

"They are a beautiful but deadly," he said.

The works are presented through video, paintings, photos, pillows and parasols.

MISC will be launched today at 4.30pm by Prof Mike Evans, head of the university's School of Arts and Social Sciences, and will run from 10am-4pm until May 30.

Topics:  art design exhibition southern cross university student



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