Majestic young sea-eagle on his release day
Majestic young sea-eagle on his release day Contributed

Delicate rescue for bird in barbed wire

THIS handsome, immature sea-eagle was found on a barb wire fence, his feet entangled in pink twine.

With a wingspan of 1.8-2m this was a delicate rescue, if the talons were to be avoided. Five of his primary feathers were broken. The repair of primary feathers involved a Vet assisted procedure and a lengthy stay in care. Fortunately WIRES has a suitable purpose built 'bird of prey' enclosure.

This regal bird has been the perfect patient and seemed to acknowledge his carers as helping in his recovery. It's hard not to be impressed by his demeanour and sheer beauty. He was successfully released back into the wild last week.

A threatened species, the Sea-eagle is known as a 'Fish Raptor' but also eat bats, birds & small mammals. When fishing they make an impressive power-dive and talons first, pluck their prey from the water with striking accuracy and finesse. The female is slightly larger than the male as is with all raptors.

These magnificent birds live on our coastal cliffs and inhabit inland waterbodies. They are Australia's second largest raptor, have striking yet graceful features, white and grey plumage, huge talons and a massive beak. Pairing up for life, Sea-eagles build enormous stick nests usually in the tallest trees.

WIRES would like to thank Casino Vet Clinic for their care and help.

Contact WIRES for rescues, advice or enquiries. The 24-hour hotline is for all calls to WIRES in the Northern Rivers - 6628 1898. www.wiresnr.org



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