Graduates are finding themselves too inexperienced to get the job they studied for, and over qualified for the entry level positions at the companies they want to work for.
Graduates are finding themselves too inexperienced to get the job they studied for, and over qualified for the entry level positions at the companies they want to work for. Allan Reinikka

Degree of difficulty

A STORY doing the online rounds through the week highlighted the difficulty some university graduates are having in finding jobs - not because of any shortage of opportunities, but because employers see them as over-qualified.

Reportedly, graduates are finding themselves too inexperienced to get the job they studied for, and over qualified for the entry level positions at the companies they want to work for.

Which does make sense - spending years at university to earn your masters won't make you any more attractive a candidate for a position in which a bachelor qualification would suffice.

The report said the increase in over-qualified applicants served to highlight the importance of balancing theory and practical experience.

"We receive a high volume of applications from candidates at the entry level who have achieved their Masters," the report said.

"This creates huge competition for a limited number of roles, but also places the spotlight on… the importance of gaining practical experience before you become overqualified."

Universities are big on including work placements and internships as part of their degrees, so adding a practical element to your studies shouldn't be too difficult.

It not only diversifies your learning but it puts you in front of potential employers to demonstrate your passion and abilities.

There's nothing wrong with starting at the bottom, and spending a few years working your way up the ladder.

You'll be learning and earning and can always apply the skills you learn on the job to future studies (and likely get credit towards the qualification for them too).

Additional qualifications don't necessarily mean you skip straight to middle-management.

I remember being told you go to high school to learn the skills to get into university (or to secure an apprenticeship or traineeship). Once there, you learn the skills to get the job.

Once you have the job, that's when you actually learn how to do the job.

There's logic to that, I think. A qualification isn't just recognition of skills learned and knowledge gained, it shows you can commit to, and see through to completion, such a major undertaking.

Whatever the qualification, it's as much about you committing to earning it, as it is about what you learn.



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