Governor of district 24 Stephanie Gooding (left), international president of Quota Gwenn Jackson, president elect Chris Tracey-Patte and district 24 governor elect Pat Bride at the Ballina RSL for the annual meeting of Quota.
Governor of district 24 Stephanie Gooding (left), international president of Quota Gwenn Jackson, president elect Chris Tracey-Patte and district 24 governor elect Pat Bride at the Ballina RSL for the annual meeting of Quota. Jay Cronan

Quota's donation comes to fruition

IT IS said that good-will and charity will keep giving and such was the case for the president of the international service organisation Quota when she visited the Northern Rivers this week.

In 2006 Quota, which was foundered in the United States 92 years ago to support people who were deaf or speech-impaired, donated $US100,000 to the Sydney Cochlear Implant Centre (SCIC) after seeing their ground-breaking research.

In a serendipitous moment, president Gwenn Jackson, arrived in Ballina on Saturday for Quota’s northern NSW Annual Conference just ahead of the opening of the new Lismore branch of the SCIC.

Past district governor of the Alstonville-Wollongbar chapter of Quota Stephanie Gooding realised the poetic coincidence and invited audiologist Eleanor McKendrick from the centre to address the conference.

Quota was formed in 1919 and today it has over 300 groups in 14 countries throughout the Americas, Europe, the Caribbean, South Pacific and South East Asia and provides humanitarian aid to disadvantaged woman and children around the world.

Mrs Jackson, an obstetrician from Louisiana, is visiting Australia to talk to groups and workshop ways to keep the organisation buoyant in a fast-changing globalised world.

“If you look at the trends most service organisations and volunteer groups have a declining membership and it is generational,” she said.

“So we’re trying to determine what we need to do as an organisation to attract those generations so we can perpetuate ourselves.

“Almost a century ago Quota was only for professional women now we’re open to all so over time the organisation has changed.

“The mandate is still that we impact local communities with our work and each group gets to define that ... our favourite focus has been helping those who are deaf, hard of hearing, have speech impediments or communication issues but in developing countries the focus has been on disadvantaged women, their needs and the needs of their children.”



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