Club‘s hilarious way of beating dance ban

 

 

POLICE are yet to issue any fines over alleged breaches of social distancing and crowd number limits at Brisbane nightclubs over the weekend.

It follows reports that venues were flooded with patrons as the city's night-life precincts roared back to life, albeit with strict measures to prevent the spread of coronavirus.

Queensland Police said investigations were continuing into whether venues respected social distancing rules, however no fines have yet been issued.

It comes as a Brisbane nightclub has come up with innovative ways for patrons to rave while adhering to COVID-19 restrictions.

 

Paul McGarry, Tasha Losan, Marc Hackenberg, Luis Ibanez and Nadia Bergez at Sub Rosa. Picture: Josh Woning
Paul McGarry, Tasha Losan, Marc Hackenberg, Luis Ibanez and Nadia Bergez at Sub Rosa. Picture: Josh Woning

Sub Rosa in Fortitude Valley started hosting its 'micro club' during the peak of COVID-19 restrictions, with DJs playing live sets that were streamed to thousands of people via Facebook.

"We started off just doing the live stream, it would literally be one DJ in, one DJ out," owner Shane Brady said.

"People were dobbing us in for illegal parties and stuff like that and the police seemed amused to discover the people dancing were inflatable pool toys."

During the strictest phase of COVID-19 restrictions, Sub Rosa held a micro club to a group of inflatable animals. Picture: Luis Ibanez
During the strictest phase of COVID-19 restrictions, Sub Rosa held a micro club to a group of inflatable animals. Picture: Luis Ibanez

As restrictions eased, they invited patrons to the club for a dance party in their own socially-distanced box on the dance floor.

"That was a big no-no, we got in no uncertain terms by the police that everyone had to stay seated the whole time, unless they were smoking of course," Mr Brady said.

 

DJ Marc Hackenberg at Sub Rosa. Picture: Liam Kidston
DJ Marc Hackenberg at Sub Rosa. Picture: Liam Kidston

 

 

"So basically dancing was banned, you couldn't even stand and listen to the music like that.

"I wanted to discourage people from dancing so that's why we put all the chairs there, so people could sit and spin around on the chairs, and that seemed to work."

Sub Rosa is now hosting dance floor raves, but patrons have to stay in their seat. Picture: Luis Ibanez
Sub Rosa is now hosting dance floor raves, but patrons have to stay in their seat. Picture: Luis Ibanez

For now, patrons must sit and are invited to use their jazz hands to dance along to the music.

Swivel chairs have been set up in the front row.

"We felt like we were in a bad remake of footloose for a bit, but people have been pretty understanding," Mr Brady said.

"It's only for a couple more weeks hopefully."

The Sub Rosa dance floor, COVID-19 edition. Picture: Luis Ibanez
The Sub Rosa dance floor, COVID-19 edition. Picture: Luis Ibanez

On Sunday, Sub Rosa hosted an Access All Ability rave.

"We quite regularly get wheelies in so we thought we would open the play to those guys because they would probably be the people who can dance the best while sitting down," Mr Brady said.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Originally published as Club's hilarious way of beating dance ban



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