POINTS JUMP: Queensland bowlers Jayden Christie and Sean Ingham will shoot further up the rankings after winning the Summerland Pairs at Ballina.
POINTS JUMP: Queensland bowlers Jayden Christie and Sean Ingham will shoot further up the rankings after winning the Summerland Pairs at Ballina. Mitchell Craig

Clubs have a duty of care in the heat

BOWLS NSW has told clubs to be aware of their duty of care to ensure the health and safety of bowlers during the current extreme weather conditions.

They may cancel the game before it starts or during play if they believe the weather is not likely to be suitable for play.

Bowls Australia has a policy that when the temperature reaches 36 degrees play will be suspended.

Players will complete the end and move to a cool shady area. If the temperature goes below 36, play is able to resume.

It says the controlling body can monitor the temperature through the Bureau of Meteorology website or the bureau's 'pocket weather application', accessible through smart phones.

It is interesting to note that if the temperature is 38 degrees or above, stewards can cancel a horse race meeting.

Our champion

WITH Dubbo's 15-year-old Jono Davis getting well-justified plaudits for his brilliant Summerland Singles win, we tend to overlook our own homegrown Ballina-Evans Head boom kid Aaron Teys who has an even better record.

Teys, now 22 and playing at Warilla, like Davis won every possible title as a junior; like Davis he won back-to-back A grade club championships from age 12; but in 2013 Teys not only won the Summerland Singles but followed it up next year with a win in the Summerland Pairs, a feat young Davis has yet to do.

Since moving to Warilla - the home of some of the game's greatest exponents - Teys became the Australian Open singles winner in 2015, the NSW singles champion of champions, among a host of other prestigious titles. He now is firmly ensconced in the Australian national team.

The Australian Open championship success entitles Teys to contest the world singles title at the World Youth Championships at Broadbeach on March 27 to April 2. As he also won the Australian Open mixed pairs a year ago with Ellen Ryan, he is a big chance in the dual-gender event as well. Ryan will play in the women's singles as the defending world champion and 2015 Australian Open women's singles champion.

Ranking points

TOP-RANKED for Queensland in the current Bowls Australia listings is former Condong bowler Steve Halmai. He's No 7 in the overall national rankings.

Halmai, who represented England in both versions of the game - five outdoors internationals and 10 indoors - lived at Clothiers Creek with five sons named Matthew, Mark, Luke, John and Steven.

Overall national rankings are likely to change when points for the Summerland Series are allotted. A win in the Summerland Pairs shot 18-year-old Jayden Christie (Helensvale) into 15th place following his success with Mark Casey in the Queensland state pairs. Christie's partner in the Summerland Pairs win, Australian Under-25 rep Sean Ingham (Broadbeach), was ranked No 14 but his runner-up result in the Summerland Singles is sure to see him climb the ladder.

Commonwealth duty

A CALL for volunteers for bowls positions at next year's Commonwealth Games on the Gold Coast closed last Friday. Volunteers were sought for a number of positions such as scoreboard attendant and paddle-stick holder.

Successful applicants will have to pay travel and accommodation costs but public transport in and around the Gold Coast will be free. They get a uniform kit and meals during a rostered shift. The bowls section of the Games is from April 5 to April 13.

Big finish

IAN Martin finished like Black Caviar in an up-and-down triples game against veteran skip Trevor Clarke at Lismore Heights. Clarke won the first five ends and lost the next six. With three ends to go he trailed by one shot. In the first two of those ends he scored eight shots to go into the last in front 22-15. All appeared lost for Martin - until he scored a seven to tie the game 22-22.

MY VIEW: ON 'DUMPING'

DUMPING - that greens-damaging throwing of a bowl rather than releasing it smoothly - is like overdoing alcohol or gambling: a person has to admit there is a problem before anything can be done about it.

Dumping is serious enough for Bowls Australia to have a policy whereby an offender can be ordered from the green. The player is first warned by officials and then if greens damage is still being caused he is required to leave the game. If the player refuses to go, the game is over and the opponent wins on a forfeit.

Says Bowls Australia: "This policy acknowledges that greens are the core material asset of clubs and inherently expensive to repair and replace. This applies to both grass and artificial surfaces. This policy also acknowledges that through remedial practices all bowlers should be able to continue to enjoy and compete." It suggests an offending player should be approached by the club proposing coaching.

This is where the approach is important. I've seen good club members who would never admit they are dumpers get their knickers in a knot and give up the game over the inconsiderate way they've been told they are offending and spoiling it for others.

It's a hell of a problem. Nobody wants to hurt a sensitive player's feelings but dumping - usually the penalty for getting old or disabled - can leave a green badly indented.

The artificial arm is a godsend for dumpers. But suggesting a player try one requires tact and understanding. The player also requires a medical certificate and state approval before one can be used in competition.



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