A company that offered services to people with a disability has collapsed.
A company that offered services to people with a disability has collapsed.

Clients, staff in limbo as family feud buries company

ALMOST 100 people with a disability and 75 workers face an uncertain future after a mother used the Supreme Court to wind-up her daughter's company following an ongoing family feud.

Manly-based My Life Support Services collapsed on July 21 when Susan Norman successfully applied to the Supreme Court to have the multimillion-dollar company she co-owns with her daughter Allison Dunn tipped into liquidation.

The bitter battle between the British-born women has left 90 clients with a disability and the organisation's 75 workers in limbo.

Susan Norman successfully applied to the Supreme Court to have My Life Support Services, which she co-owns with her daughter Allison Dunn, tipped into liquidation. Picture: Annette Dew
Susan Norman successfully applied to the Supreme Court to have My Life Support Services, which she co-owns with her daughter Allison Dunn, tipped into liquidation. Picture: Annette Dew

Founded in 2007, My Life Support Services offers tailored accommodation and community support to people with an intellectual, physical or psychiatric disability.

Control of the business was handed to experienced Jirsch Sutherland liquidator Chris Baskerville last month.

He is continuing to offer the disability support services while a buyer for the business is found.

"My team and I are basically acting as top level management and holding this business together," Mr Baskerville said.

"It's stressful and requires a calm head."

The mother and daughter feud started about one year ago and ended last month when the court stepped in.

"There are two directors who can't make a decision, the company is at loggerheads and can't move forward," Mr Baskerville said.

"The court says in those circumstances a director can apply to wind-up a company on just and equitable grounds." 

Ms Dunn, 40, took a 50 per cent stake in the company in 2018 when her stepfather ceased to be a director.

Mrs Norman, 65, has owned half of the business since August 2016 however claimed she had been locked out of the business.

Neither Ms Dunn or Ms Norman could be contacted for comment.

Ms Norman last year told Channel 9 her daughter had locked her out of the business.

Ms Dunn did not respond to the claim.

Mr Baskerville said little was owed to creditors, with the company operating as a profitable and cashflow positive business before the wind-up application.

A sale campaign was launched last week with expressions of interests due Tuesday.



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