Annastacia Palaszczuk has been called on not to cave in to demands by the state’s corruption watchdog to strengthen planned integrity laws.
Annastacia Palaszczuk has been called on not to cave in to demands by the state’s corruption watchdog to strengthen planned integrity laws.

CCC integrity demands ‘would make politicians criminals’

THE Local Government Association of Queensland has implored the Premier not to cave to pressure from the state's corruption watchdog and change proposed integrity laws.

They say proposed laws changes championed by Crime and Corruption Commission (CCC) chair Alan MacSporran would see innocent politicians made criminals for mistakes as simple as paperwork errors.

The so-called 'Trad laws' have caused a political storm this month after Ms Palaszczuk promised to enact laws based on CCC recommendations that stemmed from its assessment of

Deputy Premier Jackie Trad's failure to declare an investment property last year.

But the proposed laws have been savaged by Mr MacSporran, who says they will effectively weaken the corruption framework already in place and do not reflect what he recommended.

The proposed legislation would require an MP to have acted "intentionally" in not declaring a conflict of interest, but the CCC says it should be a strict public liability offence, removing the dishonest intent requirement.

LGAQ chief execution Greg Hallam said councillors could face up to two years jail under the planned regime.

He said the element of intent was critical as it would ensure innocent mistakes or errors of judgment weren't criminalised.

Crime and Corruption Commission chair Alan MacSporran criticises the Palaszczuk Government’s proposed integrity laws at a public hearing (AAP Image/Attila Csaszar)
Crime and Corruption Commission chair Alan MacSporran criticises the Palaszczuk Government’s proposed integrity laws at a public hearing (AAP Image/Attila Csaszar)

"Elected representatives are entitled to natural justice and a presumption of innocence," Mr Hallam said.

"Removing the element of intent would see them essentially considered guilty until proven

innocent.

"We cannot have a situation where councillors are hauled before the courts for an administrative oversight, when there was no intention to act dishonestly in order to benefit themselves or others.

"I urge the Government not to bow to pressure and remove the element of intent from the new offences." 



Weird, wonderful animals of the Casino dog show

premium_icon Weird, wonderful animals of the Casino dog show

ABOUT a thousand dogs of all shapes and sizes were being preened to perfection at...

Brown snake bites Northern Rivers woman

premium_icon Brown snake bites Northern Rivers woman

A NORTHERN Rivers woman comes across one of Australia’s deadliest creatures while...

Driver’s miraculous escape, car collides with truck

premium_icon Driver’s miraculous escape, car collides with truck

THE main arterial road between Lismore and Ballina has been closed eastbound since...