SALUTES FOR A SERVICEMAN: Military background people in the funeral pay their respects to Kevin Muldoon at St Carthages Cathedral,
SALUTES FOR A SERVICEMAN: Military background people in the funeral pay their respects to Kevin Muldoon at St Carthages Cathedral,

Hundreds honour "Captain Kev"

AN OVERWHELMING number of people turned out yesterday to honour the life of Kevin Muldoon, AFSM, accompanied fittingly by red and blue flashing lights to oversee the service.

 

Patrick Gorbunovs

A horde of fire trucks, police cars and ambulances lined the streets in a watchful guard as an enormous crowd gathered in Lismore to farewell Mr Muldoon and packing St Carthage's Cathedral.

 

More than 500 grieving relatives, friends, colleagues, and fellow servicemen converged to celebrate the life of "Captain Kev", the former Goonellabah Fire Station captain who devoted himself to the service for more than four decades.

Mr Muldoon died suddenly on October 11 of cardiac arrest after being struck by a falling tree at a federal property.

 

Mourners took a place in the cathedral wherever they could, standing on the steps outside, or sitting on the limited floor space while the service, presided over by Rev. Graeme R Davis, heard recitations of loving memories of the dedicated serviceman.

 

Kevin Cocciola spoke on behalf of the family and said: "He will be sadly missed."

Later John Mace OAM of the NSW Rural Fire Service and Retired Assistant Commissioner, NSW Fire Brigade, Bob Dobson AFSM told the crowd of "Captain Kev's" achievements as a fire fighter, and his never-ending commitment to the service.

Captain Kevin James Muldoon, rest in peace, knowing your job has been well done, Mr Dobson said.

 

As the funeral came to a close, the many members there from the Rural Fire Service and the NSW Fire Brigades formed a large guard of honour, standing at attention before saluting their fallen member.

 

The committed fire fighter had only retired from his role as captain in 2007 at the age of 71, a role he'd held for 31 years.

At his retirement, he was the last of the station's original staff, having begun working there when the Goonellabah station opened in 1972.

Mr Muldoon had also worked at The Northern Star for more than 40 years, starting as a linotype operator and finishing up as a day foreman.

After his death, his loving wife, Rhonda, spoke of his continued commitment to his work.

"He was always there well before starting time and was a dedicated worker," she said.

"If his beeper went, he'd go straight to the fire."



HOT SPOT: The suburb that's perfect for first home buyers

premium_icon HOT SPOT: The suburb that's perfect for first home buyers

Affordable, close to the CBD and ready for buyers

This man farms the best avocados on the Northern Rivers

premium_icon This man farms the best avocados on the Northern Rivers

There is no better feeling than cutting open that perfect avo

700km above Earth: Lismore artist's breathtaking project

premium_icon 700km above Earth: Lismore artist's breathtaking project

Incredible work shortlisted for prestigious international award

Local Partners