Teen dancers show moves to keep Indigenous culture strong

DEADLY DOOBS: Kadina High School Year 7 and 8 dancers performed at this week’s family fun day at the YWCA NSW Northern Rivers Community Centre at Goonellabah. Back row from left: Merinda Smith, Martika Walker, Summah Low, Tewanna Kidwell. Front row: Yinnarra-Ebonee Wightman-King, Lala Glew, Bobby Smith and Tywana Caldwell.
DEADLY DOOBS: Kadina High School Year 7 and 8 dancers performed at this week’s family fun day at the YWCA NSW Northern Rivers Community Centre at Goonellabah. Back row from left: Merinda Smith, Martika Walker, Summah Low, Tewanna Kidwell. Front row: Yinnarra-Ebonee Wightman-King, Lala Glew, Bobby Smith and Tywana Caldwell. Jamie Brown

BASED on the crowd's reaction, Kadina High School's Deadly Doobs dance group rocked at this week's Aboriginal and Islander Family Fun Day at the YWCA NSW community centre in Goonellabah.

Doob is a Bundjalung word for young women and these Year 7 and 8 students are living proof that Aboriginal culture is alive and well in the next generation.

For local elder Ros Sten, who opened the festivities, the importance of maintaining a fighting spirit with regards to culture cannot be overstated.

"Sorry Day was a very special moment for us as Aboriginal people and the momentum has continued," she said.

"Other people aren't frightened to talk to us. They are more interested in our history.

"But 200 years of our people being downtrodden can only be corrected with time, clarity, understanding and listening."

I'm proud of who I am. Days like this are about keeping our culture strong.

 

Aunty Ros said young Aboriginal people were now starting to ask questions about their own heritage.

"We have got to be positive about how things have changed for us as a people," she continued.

"The biggest eye-opener for me was the role of Aboriginal people in the opening of the 2000 Olympic Games - and Kathy Freeman's gold medal-winning race.

"That was one thing that really opened Australia's eyes. The apology from Rudd in February 2008 couldn't have come at a better time.

"These have been the biggest changes for Aboriginal people in my life."

The Deadly Doobs echoed Aunty Ros' statements, saying the importance of keeping their culture alive was incredibly important.

"I'm proud of who I am," said Tywana Coldwell. "Days like this are about keeping our culture strong."



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