OPENING UP: PhD candidate at SCU, Mitchell Kirby, and lead investigator for the sunflower audio project, Dr Barry Hill with the SCU Sunflower.
OPENING UP: PhD candidate at SCU, Mitchell Kirby, and lead investigator for the sunflower audio project, Dr Barry Hill with the SCU Sunflower. Mireille Merlet

SCU brings World Environment Day message to community

SEVEN billion dreams. One Planet. Consume with care. That's the theme for World Environment Day, on Friday, June 5, that will be celebrated at SCU University with some pretty cool activities.

Help build an eight-metre long footprint made of sand to symbolise the number of people living on the earth, create a pathway of string through a maze of trees to consider the impact of our actions on the ecosystem and check out the SCU Sunflower, Australia's largest solar powered audio-visual production system.

Dr Barry Hill, lead researcher on the Sunflower project which looks at how to apply sustainable technology to the music industry said the system is equivalent to a 19KVA generator and could run a house.

Associate Professor Amanda Reichelt-Brushett, Deputy Head of the School of Environment, Science and Engineering, who thought up the ideas for the activities, said the whole community was invited to join in the day.

"Science can enable us to understand what needs to change to manage the environment in a more sustainable manner - think how far recycling has come in the last decade or so," she said.

You can find the activities on the grassy hill between the SCU Gym & Pool and A Block - Engineering between 10am and 2pm.

Check out SCU's World Environment Day promotional video.

 

MAKING OUR CATCHMENT GREENER

Mitchell Kirby, a first year PhD student who is helping clean up our rivers, is one "green" student who will be taking part in World Environment Day.

The Lismore resident is involved in a project that uses incentives such as rate rebates or free seedlings to encourage landholders to maintain and improve natural systems that help keep the land and water healthy.

Part of an Australian Research Council project, it is centred on improving river health in the Richmond River catchment.



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