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Byron Bay photographer captures the world in time lapse

STUNNING EFFECT: Time lapse photography can be problematic, but amazing.
STUNNING EFFECT: Time lapse photography can be problematic, but amazing. Evan Malcom

HE HAS been photobombed by wild boar and had hours of footage destroyed by rain, but for one Byron Bay filmmaker the challenges of timelapse photography are all worth it.

Professional photographer and recent SAE filmmaking graduate, Evan Malcolm has just released his short environmental documentary Lapse of Reason, which consists entirely of time-lapse imagery of stunning natural scenery filmed in 12 different Australian locations from Byron Bay to Arnhem Land and down to Canberra.

The five minute film, which Evan sees as a pilot of a longer Baraka style documentary he would like to produce, took six months to make using cutting-edge time-lapse equipment and technologies.

To produce the film, Evan used multi-axis motion control time-lapse equipment from Kessler Crane in the USA, which allows the camera to sit on a track and move across multiple axis over a period of time.

"Time-lapse captures something in nature that the human eye just can't see," Mr Malcolm said.

Lapse of Reason shows the fragility and vulnerability of the Australian environment through iconic scenery from the outback, waterfalls and beaches to imagery showing consumerism taking its toll such as bright city lights chewing up electricity and images of coal burning power plants.

"I endeavoured to take the viewer on a visual journey through several Australian environments. Some are natural and some are mankind's most awful legacies on planet earth," Mr Malcolm said,

While the results are stunning, time-lapse filmmaking is painstakingly hard to produce, he said.

Cape Byron.
Cape Byron. Evan Malcom

"In daytime you can get 15 seconds of footage from 15 minutes of filming, but at night you need five hours to produce 10 seconds because of the longer exposure time needed to produce each frame," he said.

Guarding a camera for hours on end is also required, and having your filming interrupted by unpredictable weather - or curious photobombing wildlife - is always a risk.

"You can spend hours travelling to a location and setting up, only to have the weather or wildlife interrupt filming.

"When I was filming in the Sturt National Park I was tracked down by a wild boar which came right up to the camera."

One of Evan Malcolm's photos.
One of Evan Malcolm's photos. Evan Malcom


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