TIME OUT: Relaxing after a hard day on the rink at the Lismore Inline Hockey Tournament are players Matt Cramp (left) and Simon Leader.
TIME OUT: Relaxing after a hard day on the rink at the Lismore Inline Hockey Tournament are players Matt Cramp (left) and Simon Leader. Stuart Turner

Boxer enjoys time on the rink

JOE Scofield is a man who lives on his sporting wits - and enjoys it.

The 23-year-old was among the players taking part in this year's Lismore Inline Hockey Tournament.

Keen boxer Scofield has been playing the fast-paced sport, which is similar to ice hockey but played on a smooth surface for years.

With action always fast and furious, Scofield said he really enjoyed the challenge of the sport.

"It can get intense, especially when you are playing at a higher level," he said.

"You have to stay on your toes and move around a lot.

"The extra fitness you get helps with boxing and it is good fun."

Several locals and teams from Queensland attended the competition, which took place at the Lismore Skating and Putt Putt Centre.

Last weekend's event, which acts as a fundraiser for the Lismore club, also helped sharpen players' skills ahead of the national titles later this year.

Lismore Red took the title, defeating Lismore Black 8-6 in a hard-fought final.

Craig Newby, who helped organise and run the event and is also participating in the forthcoming Nationals, said it had been a memorable competition.

"There was some great play across the board," Newby said.

"The extra time on the rink playing competitively gives you more practice time as well, which was good.

"It was good to be a part of this."

Newby thanked all the volunteers who took part and helped the event.

Training sessions for new players take place at the Bridge St centre every Monday for juniors (5-6.30pm) and seniors (6.30-8pm).



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