THE LADS ARE BACK: Jake Stone and Stav Yiannoukas with band Bluejuice head to the Great Northern January 10.
THE LADS ARE BACK: Jake Stone and Stav Yiannoukas with band Bluejuice head to the Great Northern January 10. Contributed

Bluejuice sizzles

ROPE jumping championships, pashing older women … when it comes to film-clips, five-piece Sydney band Bluejuice are unlikely to leave you bored.

Stav Yiannoukas and Jake Stone were recently in the United States filming the band's next two clips and it doesn't look like the antics will be coming to a halt any time soon.

When Pulse speaks to Stone he's back at home cooking up an omelette.

"We went over there (the US) because Red Bull and our record company decided to give us money for no reason," Stone says.

The two front men left the other three band members, Jamie Cibej, Jerry Craib and James Hauptmann, behindin Sydney.

Cibej was left in charge of the band's Twitter feed, making mention of booby-trapped mics.

"Jamie (Cibej) has an over-active imagination," Stone says. "It's actually funny because in reality the guy doesn't speak. It's amazing the levels of silence he can achieve.

You can be sitting with him in a room for six hours and he won't say a thing. And yet online he does a great job of pretending to be us.

"He's a great identity thief. He used to get paid to pretend to be Missy Higgins."

The band's latest film clip for the first single, Act Yr Age, from the the band's third album Company, sees Stone making out with an older woman in a park.

The next clip for Shock revolves around a karaoke bar, while On My Own is a Fear and Loathing style Las Vegas adventure.

"We were only there for five days and we were in Las Vegas for 24 hours filming," Stone says. "I think we had an hours sleep in Vegas."

Aside from the band's jovial summer anthems and fun clips, the two front men, who have both worked as comedians, are loved as much for their on-and-off stage antics as they are for their music.

As with any joke though, there's often someone who bears the brunt of it.

At a Bluejuice gig a few years back the girl in front copped a bottle of water poured all over her while Stone said: "Oh look, she's just going to take it".

There was no backlash. Two punters made their silent protest by walking out of the sold-out gig.

So can the antics go too far?

"I guess so, yeah," Stone says. "It's never intended to be generally offensive, nor is it intended to be chauvinistic which it sounds like that was."

"I think if you cross the line you know about it and you can tell by the general vibe of the crowd how far you can take things.

"Don't get me wrong, we can be ****heads."

Stone says he wants people to know when they come to a Bluejuice gig and put themselves in the front row, that sort of thing is going to happen.

"I'm confident that there are enough people who come to the show for that reason," he says of the band's playful onstage persona.

"I don't want to be promoting sexism but I do want to be promoting sexuality."

Expect the full Bluejuice antics when they head to Byron Bay and remember it is intended in jest.

They head to the Great Northern Hotel as part of their Sizzling 2012 tour.

The lads will be joined by The Aston Shuffle on January 10.

Tickets are $29 from 9pm. www.thenorthern.com.au/gigs



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