Ellami Wolstencroft eating mangoes in their tree in Barkers Vale. This years weather pattern will ensure a bumper crop for the northern region.
Ellami Wolstencroft eating mangoes in their tree in Barkers Vale. This years weather pattern will ensure a bumper crop for the northern region. Kris Henderson

Blooming good mangoes

THE FRUIT of love and fertility, the mango, is back.

Across the region mango lovers are celebrating, joyous their backyard trees are once again dripping with the fruit.

“We can’t wait for them to ripen,” said Kris Henderson who has two mango trees flushed with fruit at her Barkers Vale home.

“The children are looking longingly at the trees everyday,” she said.

Northern Rivers commercial mango growers are also breathing a sigh of relief; after three bad mango seasons they finally have a crop to harvest.

The problem has been too much spring rain over the past three seasons, according to Jeremy Bright a Department of Primary Industries horticulturalist.

“You need good flowering and good pollination,” Mr Bright said.

A hot dry spring is required for the fruit to set properly.

“This year’s crop is looking good,” he said.

Most of the NSW mango industry is based on the Hogarth Range, west of Casino, where the Kensington Pride variety of mango thrives.

The range, which receives about 60 per cent less rainfall than on the coast, produces 35,000 trays of mangos each season. The industry is valued at about $700,000.

While the NSW industry is only small compared to Queensland and the Northern Territory, it is significant because it crops late between February and April and provides late season fruit to the Australian market.



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