Anade Oboya has collected nine boxes of toys, clothes and shoes to give away to The Salvation Army as part of his Give Half Project. Picture: AAP/Renae Droop
Anade Oboya has collected nine boxes of toys, clothes and shoes to give away to The Salvation Army as part of his Give Half Project. Picture: AAP/Renae Droop

Big-hearted boy gives away half his belongings

A NINE-YEAR-OLD north Brisbane boy is planning to give away half his belongings to help people who have nothing.

Anade Oboya, of Petrie, said he came up with the idea for the Give Half Project after starting a gratitude journal.

"Two months ago I realised that I can live with half of the things that I have and can help people who don't have any," he said.

 

Anade Oboya is giving away half his belongings. Picture: AAP/Renae Droop
Anade Oboya is giving away half his belongings. Picture: AAP/Renae Droop

 

"A lot of time we don't realise we are lucky. I did not realise how lucky I am until my mum asked me to write every day what I am grateful for in a gratitude journal.

"Many children in Australia and around the world are suffering from not having enough to eat, no clothes and toys.

"I have all these things and am lucky to have the opportunity to do sports, music and a great education."

Anade has packed nine boxes to donate to The Salvation Army - mainly toys, clothes and shoes. His parents have given him clothes, jewellery and shoes to add to the collection.

Anade said he had spoken to some of his friends about the project and they had joined him in donating "amazing toys and clothes".

His mum Abang Othow said she was very proud of her son.

"Anade was born in Australia however my husband (Okoth Opap) and I both come from refugee backgrounds and both of us came to the western world as teenagers with no family," she said.

"We worked very hard for everything we have and managed to achieve success on our own, in higher education and at present writing a book and venturing into business.

 

Anade Oboya and his mother Abang Othow. Picture: AAP/Renae Droop
Anade Oboya and his mother Abang Othow. Picture: AAP/Renae Droop

 

"My father was killed in the war in South Sudan and I was separated from my mum from the age of five years old, only to be reunited after 17 years when I brought her and my siblings to Australia.

"I talked to Anade about the difficulties facing other people in the world and how one in three children die from malnutrition and hunger-related illnesses.

"He is generally a caring young person however at times, being in a rich country where there is always someone who has more, it is easy to be sensitised, hence the normalisation of wealth occurs as something that everyone has.

"I encouraged Anade to keep a gratitude journal and he came up with the realisation that he is privileged to have the things he has. This prompted him to start Give Half Project.

"I was so overjoyed that Anade at his age came up with an incredible project to not only help others, but also to encourage others to do the same.

"He likes to keep his things and look after them for many years. That's why this is such a big decision and I am so proud of him."



RAIN DANCE: Kids boogie to bust the drought

premium_icon RAIN DANCE: Kids boogie to bust the drought

‘Raindance’ singer Sara Storer dropped in to help lift their spirits

Rain helps fireys, but more needed

Rain helps fireys, but more needed

THE much-needed rain is a mixed blessing on the fireground, with cloudy conditions...

‘Absolutely fantastic’: Surf lifesavers’ impressive victory

premium_icon ‘Absolutely fantastic’: Surf lifesavers’ impressive victory

THE Far North Coast surf lifesaving team has won the country titles for the seventh...