BEACH EROSION: Not much left of Main Beach at Evans Head thanks to large swells and king tides.
BEACH EROSION: Not much left of Main Beach at Evans Head thanks to large swells and king tides. Samantha Elley

Beach disappearing

STEEP sandy hills have greeted the beach goers at Evans Head these holidays, but despite fears of erosion, one long-time resident said it was a natural cycle.

Large waves and king tides have eroded so much of Main Beach that surf lifesavers have had to put their flags in the grass in front of the surf club.

Garnet Hickey, who has been a member of the Evans Head-Casino Surf Club for 47 years, said these types of seas happened on a regular basis during the Christmas break.

"It's never been as steep like this," he said.

"But the danger has been created by man where we kept fencing the sand build-up and now nature is claiming it back."

Mr Hickey remembered when the surf came right up to the surf club.

"You were only four steps down to the beach," he said.

"And this current surf club building is built on the footings of the 1922 surf club.

"In 1974 big surf actually went down behind the surf club."

Mr Hickey said after that, sand was pumped in from the river and fenced off.

"As sand accumulated it was fenced again," he said.

"It was only a matter of time before nature decided to take the sand back."

One concern Mr Hickey highlighted was the damage done when trees were ripped from the foreshore by the waves.

"When they get ripped out they take a lot of sand with them," he said.



Ice Strike Force arrests sixth person

Ice Strike Force arrests sixth person

Police have targeted the supply of ice in Lismore

Kesha cancels Bluesfest performance

Kesha cancels Bluesfest performance

Kesha will no longer be headlining Bluesfest 2018

Meet the young leaders of tomorrow

Meet the young leaders of tomorrow

Let us introduce you to our school captains

Local Partners