Bali bombing survivor Hanabeth Luke launches her account of the ordeal and her journey to recovery at the Byron Surf Festival tomorrow.
Bali bombing survivor Hanabeth Luke launches her account of the ordeal and her journey to recovery at the Byron Surf Festival tomorrow.

Bali bombing survivor tells her story

BALI bombing survivor Hanabeth Luke was completing her undergraduate degree at Southern Cross University in 2002 when she was caught up in the Bali bombing.

"My partner Marc Gajardo and I had stopped off in Bali on the way to Byron Bay - I was on the dance floor when the Sari Club was ripped to shreds by a car bomb ending Marc's life and changing mine forever," she said.

"I used severed electrical wire to escape over a 12 foot wall and went back in to find Marc. That was when I found 17 year old Tom Singer lying on the ground, and the photograph taken as I pulled Tom away from the flames became the iconic image of the Bali bombing."

Ms Luke has just returned from Bali where she attended the 10th anniversary commemoration services for the 2002 Bali bombings.

The Byron Bay resident, along with three others, was given the honour of reading out the names of the 202 people who were killed.

She has written a book about surviving the ordeal - Shock Waves, Finding Peace After the Bali Bomb - which she will launch tomorrow at the Byron Bay Community Centre as part of the Byron Surf Festival.

Shock Waves, by Hanabeth Luke. Cover by Don McAllister, Creative Ink, Miami.
Shock Waves, by Hanabeth Luke. Cover by Don McAllister, Creative Ink, Miami.

Her launch will kick off a full day of workshops and talks on surf writing, surf yoga surfing history and more.

Ms Luke and editor Tim Baker will be giving an introduction to the story and talking about the journey that they have followed in the self-publishing process.

Mr Baker is a by best-selling surf writer who also wrote the book's foreward.

There will be a question and answer session and music provided by Tim Stokes.

The book was dedicated in part to Tom Singer, who was the man who featured in the iconic image as Hanabeth led him away from the flames of the Sari Club.

Mr Singer's parents, Peter and Megan, will be there and will also say a few words.

Mr Baker will also be running a workshop on surf writing at 11am and they will be available for book signings in the community centre and later at the Artisan markets in the Railway Park.

"As soon as I could I went back to Cornwall to be with Marc's parents, organising the 'Surf for Bali' with a simple message of peace, raising $12,000 for Balinese Hospital facilities," Mr Baker said.

"When the Bali bomb was used as a reason to invade Iraq, I started to speak my message of peace publicly, which led me to speak with Tony Blair to try and stop the impending Iraq war.

"When the war began I had to get away, and found solace surfing the raw waves of Western Australia. This was when I started to write about my experiences and was the beginning of the book that is about to be launched.

"It has taken me years to complete, requiring me to venture back into the fire and finally face the pain front-on.
"I'm now living in Byron Bay, doing a PhD and teaching at Southern Cross University. Life's good, but I'm really excited to have finally completed this very personal book."

'Shock Waves, Finding Peace After the Bali Bomb' was published for the ten year anniversary of the Bali bombing and is now available in paperback on Amazon and in Mary Ryan's Bookstore in Byron Bay.

BOOK LAUNCH
'Shock Waves, Finding Peace After the Bali Bomb'
9am, Saturday October 27
SCU Room, upstairs at the Byron Bay Community Centre
Special guest: surf writer and Shock Waves editor, Tim Baker

Visit Hanabeth's Facebook page or pick up a copy at Amazon.
 



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