Allison Baden-Clay.
Allison Baden-Clay.

Audio: Listen to Gerard Baden-Clay's 000 call

GERARD Baden-Clay's murder trial has heard the triple 000 call he made to police the morning he reported his wife missing Mr Baden-Clay, 43, is accused of murdering his wife Allison Baden-Clay, 43, in April, 2012.

He reported her missing on the morning of April 20, 2012, telling police she had failed to return from her morning walk.

"My wife is not home, I do not know where she is," Mr Baden-Clay said.

"When did you last see her sir?" the operator asked.

"Last night, before I went to bed. I got up this morning and she was not there," Mr Baden-Clay said.

"That is not unusual because she often goes for a walk in the morning

"I have checked with her, called her a number of times, I think she has her phone with her."

The operator asked Mr Baden-Clay what time Allison normally gets back when she goes for a walk each morning.

"Normally she, she was planning (inaudible) in the city so she needed to leave by 7am," Mr Baden-Clay told the operator.

"I am now driving the streets; my father has come over to look after the children."
The operator then asked what the caller's name was and the name of the person who was missing.

"Gerard," he said.

"And your last name," the operator asked.

"Baden-Clay, with a hyphen" he said.

"What is your wife's name," the operator asked.

"Allison with two ls," he replied.

The operator then asked Mr Baden-Clay to describe his wife.

"She is about five six," he said.

"What colour hair has she got," the operator asked.

"It is sort of a blondy, browny, reddish sort of (inaudible)," he said.

The operator then told Mr Baden-Clay she was going to put a broadcast out on his wife and told him to go back home and wait for police to arrive.

The call lasted about two-and-a-half minutes.

Allison Baden-Clay traumatised by affair

ACCUSED wife killer Gerard Baden-Clay told a psychologist he did not believe depression was an illness and people who are suffering from it should be able "to snap out of it."

Gerard Baden-Clay, 43, is accused of murdering his wife Allison Baden-Clay, 43, in April 2012.

He reported her missing on the morning of April 20, 2012, telling police she had failed to return from her morning walk.

A canoeist located her badly decomposed body 10 days later underneath Kholo Creek Bridge.

Mr Baden-Clay has pleaded not guilty to her murder.

Psychologist Rosamond Nutting told the Brisbane Supreme Court on Tuesday Mrs Baden-Clay was "traumatised" when she had learnt of her husband's affair with Toni McHugh.

The Baden-Clays saw the Brisbane-based psychologist between October 2011, and December 2011, to discuss relationship problems they were experiencing.

Ms Nutting said the affair had impacted Allison's self-esteem.

"Gerard said he had an affair for the last three years, he being trying to end it but he had been found out before it actually ended," she said.

"Allison had been traumatised at finding out about the affair."

Ms Nutting said she spoke to both Gerard and Allison about the issue.

She told the court, while referring to the notes she made during the session, about the details of the conversation she had with the two.

"I spoke about the trauma she had undergone. She had been impacted by it and that it had impacted her self-esteem," she said.

"Gerard had said that he was black and white on some things. . .  I want to do everything I can to help Allison.

"My actions are not who I am . . . I do not believe in depression being an illness.

"I believe people can snap out of it."

Ms Nutting told the court Gerard had told her he felt "trapped" and felt failure at not being able to fix the situation.

"He said he tried to do what he could and I am the problem," she said.

"He said we had a plan . . . I was trapped. He said he wanted to fix it."

Ms Nutting told the court Ms Baden-Clay was taking medication which appeared to be "covering her depression quite well."

Earlier, psychologist Dr Lawrence Lumsden told the court he met with Mrs Baden-Clay on one occasion in December, 2010, to discuss the relationship with her husband.

Dr Lumsden said he administered a depression, anxiety and distress scale test to see if she registered any symptoms of mood adjustment.

"Her test showed that her depression, anxiety and distress levels were absolutely normal," he said.

He said there was "absolutely zero" chance she was a suicide risk.

 

Toni McHugh
Toni McHugh

Mistress says Gerard Baden-Clay was having an affair with two other women

ACCUSED wife killer Gerard Baden-Clay's former mistress has revealed he was having an affair with two other women including one while he was in a four-year relationship with her.

An emotional Toni McHugh told his Brisbane Supreme Court murder trial on Tuesday she honestly believed Mr Baden-Clay would leave his wife for her.

Ms McHugh, giving evidence for the second day at the trial, choked back tears when asked about their relationship.
Defence barrister Michael Byrne said Mr Baden-Clay had been promising Ms McHugh he would leave his wife for many years but never acted on it.

Mr Byrne showed the court an email between the two sent on March, 27, 2012, which he claimed showed how frustrated

Ms McHugh was getting because their relationship was not progressing in the way she wanted.

"I looked at rental properties tonight. There is not many available. Have you thought about what you are going to do for a place? It would be so much easier if you just moved in with me. She can get her own place and the week you have the children you move back to the house.

She does not need to know where you are staying! Sorry it is up to you to work out and I should not interfere. I am sorry," Ms McHugh said in the email.

Mr Byrne said Mr Baden-Clay was getting on with his life but Ms McHugh was not.

"I was getting on with my life and he was getting on with his," she said.

"That is correct," Mr Byrne said.

"That was the agreement . . . with the intention of being together," she said.

"Well if that is what you believed," Mr Byrne said.

"He seemed to be getting on with his life without you," he added.

Gerard Baden-Clay, 43, is accused of murdering his wife Allison Baden-Clay, 43, in April, 2012.

He reported his wife missing on the morning of April 20, 2012, telling police she had failed to return from her morning walk.

A canoeist, Daryl Joyce, located her badly decomposed body 10 days later underneath Kholo Creek Bridge.

Mr Baden-Clay has pleaded not guilty to her murder.

Baden-Clay's mistress 'delusional' about affair

GERARD Baden-Clay's defence team is grilling his former mistress about the validity of their relationship.

They have painted a picture of a woman who was delusional about their relationship and someone who would not let go.

Toni McHugh has started her second day of evidence in the Brisbane Supreme Court at her former lover Gerard Baden-Clay's murder trial.

Gerard Baden-Clay, 43, is accused of murdering his wife Allison Baden-Clay, 43, in April 2012.

He reported her missing on the morning of April 20, 2012, telling police she had failed to return from her morning walk.

A canoeist, Daryl Joyce, located her badly decomposed body 10 days later underneath Kholo Creek Bridge.

Mr Baden-Clay has pleaded not guilty to her murder.

Ms McHugh told the court under heavy questioning from defence barrister Michael Byrne "that she was angry with herself" that the relationship had not progressed the way she wanted it to.

She said she felt that she was being led up the garden path again by Gerard.

Mr Byrne asked Ms McHugh whether the contents of an email between the two the day before Allison was reported missing "was the same as it had been for the past three-and-a-half-years."

"He seemed to be getting on with his life without you," Mr Byrne asked.

"I thought it would be different this time," Ms McHugh replied.

Ms McHugh then told the court about learning she was not the only person Mr Baden-Clay was having an affair with throughout their four-year affair.

The trial before Justice Byrne continues.



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