News

Is this Australia's Stonehenge?

Steven and Evan Strong, of Tuckombil, study ancient artefacts that they believe rewrite world issues.
Steven and Evan Strong, of Tuckombil, study ancient artefacts that they believe rewrite world issues. Marc Stapelberg

A LOCAL team of amateur archaeological sleuths claim to have discovered evidence which contradicts the accepted theory humans came "out of Africa", and instead - gasp - modern man emerged in and spread from Down Under.

Father and son team Steven and Evan Strong have combined the written testimony of a forgotten Australia archaeologist, oral indigenous history, and ancient Australian artefacts to sensationally conclude that Aboriginal civilization was far more advanced than our history books have us believe.

If that wasn't bold enough, an ancient site near Mullumbimby also known as "Australia's Stonehenge" was one of at least 35 "repositories" of this ancient civilization.

On Friday night the duo kicked off their "Forgotten Origin" lecture tour at the Byron Bay Community Centre, ahead of future seminars planned in Melbourne and Sydney.

Mr Strong said the three-hour event included legitimate science such as mitochondrial DNA studies, alongside archaeological evidence which proved the existence of a sophisticated Indigenous Australian written language and technology beyond what was considered possible at the time.

At the heart of the archaeological evidence are two engraved rocks dubbed "Ros's Rocks One and Two", which Mr Strong said had already been the subject of serious papers by at least three doctors of geology, in serious scientific journals, "not just new age magazines".

"The rock is one of the hardest rocks you will find in Australia, it is at least 10,000 years old and has been cut in two, and there is no chisel today you could (use) to even mark these rocks, and they've been chiselled, and cut, and engraved…" he said.

"It's not natural, we all agree on that, and it's thousands of years old."

"Even if it's 300 years old, it breaks the rules; because none of those technologies were supposed to be here before (James) Cook came."

Asked whether he was indulging in "pseudoscience" which supported sensational conclusions, Mr Strong said the "Out of Australia" theory wasn't his alone and had already been put forward by scholars.

He said the Smithsonian Institute in Washington DC and the UK's National Geological Repository had shown interest in the artefacts and geologists working behind the scenes had built a consensus these rocks of this type had "never been seen before".

"Our advisers are some of the best geologists and archaeologists in the country."

"What we are is just the collecting point."

More evidence to inspire the theory came when the Richmond River Historical Society located correspondence from a former president of the Australian Archaeological Society from the 1930s - letters which featured a theory that Aboriginals had a written language which pre-dated most others.

Professor Frederic Slater had claimed that the Mullumbimby "standing stones" site was the most important site in Australia - even more important than Stonehenge.

Mr Strong said Slater even had an "interpretive handbook" given to him by Aboriginal elders which enabled him to understand the make-up of the very first language and the significance of the standing stone site.

"His letters were lost and found last year … what we've now found is archaeology that backs up his theory that this was the first language ever (and) was recorded there."

"The language is a combination of hand signs, letters, "sacred signs", and body parts … Slater had compiled over 28,000 words in this language."

Unfortunately, the Mullumbimby site was all but destroyed in the 1940s, ending any further investigation.

"They were going to set it up like Stonehenge… it was published all over Australia in major papers, then the site was destroyed, and once it was destroyed the whole thing disappeared, and all of Australia's notes from 1930 onwards disappeared too."

"All we're trying to do is prove that all the work he did is correct," Mr Strong said.

Topics:  history



Ballina 'uninhabitable' in latest sea level rise scenario

INUNDATION THREAT: Areas in dark blue show the impact of a 0.74m seal level rise, while areas in light blue show a 2m rise.

Ballina, Byron Bay and more coastal towns to go underwater

Bring the Ski Jump to Lismore, says MP

CONTROVERSIAL: A digital image of the proposed Lake Ainsworth Olympic ski jump facility provided by the NSW Office of Sport.

Page MP and Lismore mayor would welcome the Ski Jump in Lismore.

Climbing for Lismore flood fundraiser

The 2017 Lismore Flood

SCU student to climb Mont Blanc for Lismore.

Local Partners

Bring the Ski Jump to Lismore, says MP

PAGE MP and Lismore mayor say if Lennox Head doesn't want the proposed Ski Jump, then bring it to Lismore.


First female superhero film in 12 years

AMAZON: Actress Gal Gadot in a scene from the film Wonder Woman.

Wonder Woman opens next Thursday

Stories Troy Cassar-Daley carries around

LEGEND: Troy Cassar-Daley after receiving the Golden Guitar Award for Album of the Year during the Tamworth Country Music Festival in January.

You can see him in Ballina this weekend

What to expect at Birds of Tokyo's Ipswich gig

The band will perform at the Racehorse Hotel on Friday.

BAND member Glen Sarangapany talks music, pub grub and doing shoeys

Concert death toll revised up to 22, tour suspended

TWENTY-TWO people have been killed and at least 59 people have been injured following a terror attack in Manchester

Nattali Rize at the top of the charts

ARTIST: Australian reggae artist Nattali Rize has Native American and Samoan roots and lives between Byron Bay, Cairns and Jamaica.

Her debut album hit the top at the Global Reggae Charts

Casual Keanu says fame is ‘cool’

Keanu Reeves in a scene from the movie John Wick: Chapter 2.

NOBODY expected much of John Wick when it was released in 2014.

Ariana Grande breaks her silence after fatal blast

According to reports quoting witnesses, a mass emergency evacuation was prompted after explosions were heard at the end of US singer Ariana Grande's concert in the arena.

The entertainment industry is in shock after attack on concert

Pitch Perfect star suing Woman’s Day over ‘liar’ articles

Actor Rebel Wilson outside court on Friday.

REBEL Wilson's career destroyed by grubby campaign, court hears.

First female superhero film in 12 years

AMAZON: Actress Gal Gadot in a scene from the film Wonder Woman.

Wonder Woman opens next Thursday

Seven Year Switch: The boner to end all boners

Johnny’s outraged over claims he has a cracked boner.

She gulps. Her face says it all.

Bonville to become new housing hub

REZONING: Large areas of Bonville have been rezoned for residential

Land rezoning will turn farmland into housing

One of Maryborough's most historic homes is still for sale

FULL OF HISTORY: Trisha Moulds is owner of the historic Tinana state known as Rosehill. The beautiful home is currently for sale.

It has been the scene of both joy and tragedies over the years.

The face of the Sunshine Coast's overpriced rental crisis

Alyx Wilson had to rent a $385 unit in Currimundi because the market was too competitive for cheaper rental housing. She is now renting a room from friends who own a house in Currimundi, and says its much more affordable.

Young people feel the strain in competitive, expensive rental market

WATCH: Take a tour of a tradie's dream home

5a Bruce Hiskens Court, Norman Gardens, going for $720,000. INSET: Lea Taylor.

Huge block with potential for anything

REVEALED: Where it's cheaper to pay off a mortgage than rent

6/190 Ewing Rd, Woodridge, is listed for offers $215,000. Picture: realestate.com.au

Brisbane suburbs where it is cheaper to buy than rent

Ready to SELL your property?

Post Your Ad Here!