Australia's most wanted terrorist Neil Prakash has been killed in Iraq by a US airstrike
Australia's most wanted terrorist Neil Prakash has been killed in Iraq by a US airstrike

Australia's most dangerous terrorist killed by US strikes

AUSTRALIA'S most wanted terrorist has been killed by American airstrikes in Iraq.

The White House contacted Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull on Wednesday night, according to NewsCorp, to say that Neil Prakash, an Australian considered one of Islamic State's top recruiters, was killed by a strike on April 29.

The sister of Curtis Cheng's killer killed a week before by a US air strike on Syria.
 

Shadi Jabar Khalil Mohammad was killed alongside her Sudanese husband. She was a member of the Islamic State.

Shadi's 15-year-old brother Farhad Khalil Mohammad Jabar shot and killed Mr Cheng as he left his office inside the New South Wales Police Force headquarters in Parramatta.

The US Government believes Mr Prakash's death may have affected Islamic State's planned attacks on Western targets.

Mr Prakash appeared in Islamic State propaganda, including a message that called for attacks on Australia.

"My beloved brothers in Islam in Australia, now is the time to rise, now is the time to wake up, now is the time to rush for the (inaudible) Allah has promised you," he said in the video.

"You must start attacking before they attack you. Look how much of your sisters have been violated."

Attorney-General George Brandis told ABC Radio this morning the killing of Mr Prakash was "by no means the end of the struggle against ISIL".

Mr Brandis described the IS recruiter as "certainly the most important and dangerous" target.



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