Steve Janes, Palmer United candidate for Page.
Steve Janes, Palmer United candidate for Page. Marnie Johnston

Aspirant stands united

PALMER United candidate for Page Steve Janes never planned to get into politics, but now he finds himself in the race for a chance to represent the Northern Rivers in federal parliament.

"I think the reason I'm doing what I'm doing is because of the state of politics and the state of economics," he said at his campaign launch on Saturday.

"You have these moments in life where you can either sit around and complain, or you can get up and do something."

So when he saw information about the newly formed Palmer United Party and found himself agreeing with what they stood for, he said he knew he had to act: "I felt like it was the right thing to do."

The fact that the Palmer United Party has 150 candidates standing at the upcoming federal election (one for every electorate in Australia), as well as Senate teams in every state and territory, only a few months after forming the party, was incredible, Mr Janes said.

They are running more candidates than the Liberal Party, who only have 121, Mr Janes pointed out.

"That's a huge achievement. If that's what we've done in four months, imagine what we could do in government," he said.

"I think that says something about what is happening in the general populace and what they think about the two major parties."

"I truly believe Palmer United are a viable third option to the two-party duopoly."

Mr Janes said he'd become disillusioned with the state of politics and would like to see it get back to what it was: a proud and fine institution.

Despite starting a business - That New Coffee Shop - in Ballina, he said he couldn't shake the feeling that this was the right move for him.



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