Vanessa Kapeen’s stunning multimedia image Echidna Mating Season.
Vanessa Kapeen’s stunning multimedia image Echidna Mating Season.

Art prize tells a story

CORAKI Art Prize was a grand success again this year, with Wyrallah artist Diane Ingram eclipsing a field of more than 250 entries to take out this year's major prize.

The Wyrallah artist won the $2000 Best in Show award with her work titled Because.

Artist's inspiration

The work is one of many inspired by Diane's focus on landscapes.

"The picture actually came out of a life drawing. This is the way I see the landscape," she said.

"I like to drink in the landscape everywhere I go and it comes out at different times, when I least expect it.

"It tells me where to go and I tell it where to go, and between the two of us, we get there."

Popular art prize

The Coraki Art Prize was first established in 1997 and committee president Melva Thompson said it continues to grow in popularity, this year attracting entries from afar afield as Brisbane.

This year, the competition featured 250 works encompassing a variety of mediums, including painting, sculpture, drawing, photography and sculpture.

According to Melva, the exhibition staged at the weekend was so large that it had to be housed in two galleries.

She said the quality of the entries received for the 2015 event was exceptional.

Encouraging art shows

Diane Ingram said the worth and importance of public art competitions could not be underestimated.

"I think it is a good idea for people to get their art up on a wall," she said.

"Another reason is to give joy to someone else. As an artist you are having all the fun doing the painting, so let someone else have a look and see if it can bring some joy to them."

Coraki photo artists Sharon McKenzie and her partner Craig Jung.
Coraki photo artists Sharon McKenzie and her partner Craig Jung.

Pin hole technique

For Coraki artist Sharon McKenzie, and her partner Craig Jung, the Art Prize was a chance to show off some experimental work using the simplest equipment.

Sharon used a tin can, painted black, with a pin-hole in the side allowing light to shine onto photosensitive paper.

"What I like about the technique is that I don't have total control."

Sharon’s pin-hole photo of the Glebe Bridge, showing multiple rising sun lines as the photo was made over 28 days.
Sharon’s pin-hole photo of the Glebe Bridge, showing multiple rising sun lines as the photo was made over 28 days.

For 28 days, she allowed that image to reproduce, with the end result being a ghostly picture of the Glebe Bridge with a month's worth of sunrises and sunsets recorded as slashes of light.



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