Tiki Rose from the Pocket public school, Rod Cheal from Taronga Zoo with a Ring Tail Posum, and Chung Nuyen, and Angel Harvey from the Pocket public school at Southern Cross University as part of a project to raise awareness of the plight of theatened native animals in the Northern Rivers.
Tiki Rose from the Pocket public school, Rod Cheal from Taronga Zoo with a Ring Tail Posum, and Chung Nuyen, and Angel Harvey from the Pocket public school at Southern Cross University as part of a project to raise awareness of the plight of theatened native animals in the Northern Rivers. Doug Eaton

Mobile Taronga Zoo teaches kids to help threatened species

AROUND 200 students from local primary and high schools will come together this week to learn how to help save locally threatened wildlife species with a visit from Taronga Zoo's Mobile Zoo.

As a part of September's Threatened Species Month, Taronga Zoo will visit participating schools, as students go 'in situ' with local experts to raise awareness of the plight of threatened species, such as koalas, giant barred frogs and squirrel gliders.

During workshops, students will get up-close with some very special furry members of the Taronga Zoo's team, while learning how to assess habitat, look for evidence of species presence and test waterways.

MOBILE ZOO: Taronga Zoo’s Rod Cheal with an echidna at Southern Cross University as part of a project to raise awareness of threatened native animals in the Northern Rivers.
MOBILE ZOO: Taronga Zoo’s Rod Cheal with an echidna at Southern Cross University as part of a project to raise awareness of threatened native animals in the Northern Rivers. Doug Eaton

Students will then present their projects at the Lismore Show and Southern Cross University's 'Our Voice' Sustainability Conference for Young People by Young People, as well as via video conferences with other schools.

The project is a collaboration between SCU, Richmond Landcare, Dorroughby Environmental Education Centre, Taronga Zoo, Rous Water and Friends of the Koala, and is funded by a community grant under the Caring for Our Country program.

Principal of the Dorroughby Centre Christine Freeman is the organiser of the project.

"Kids have a close association with animals when they see animals, and when they spend some time in the habitat, they learn much more," Ms Freeman said.

"From this experience the kids will get the inspiration for a series of lessons and be able to implement an action plan for the animal in their own in school grounds."

"These kids are going to be the leaders that are going to go back to their school and their community with the knowledge about the species and how we can help it."



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