Apple Chief Executive Tim Cook, centre, poses for a selfie with customers during the debut of the iPhone X. Picture: Justin Sullivan
Apple Chief Executive Tim Cook, centre, poses for a selfie with customers during the debut of the iPhone X. Picture: Justin Sullivan

Apple battery scandal: You weren’t ‘paying attention’

APPLE has officially completed its apology tour over the iPhone throttling scandal and is set to give consumers a choice in the matter.

The tech giant has faced a wave of criticism (and lawsuits) since it was reported that Apple was deliberately slowing down old iPhones to help ageing batteries cope with new features and smooth performance.

In an interview with America's ABC News, Apple boss Tim Cook said he was "deeply" sorry but added when the company brought out the software code "about a year ago" people may not have been "paying attention."

"When we did put it out, we did say what it was but I don't think a lot of people were paying attention. But maybe we should have been clearer as well," he said.

"We deeply apologise for anyone who thinks we have some other kind of motivation."

In the next update to Apple's iPhone operating software iOS 11, users will be given new details about the health of their phone's battery.

"In a developer release which happens next month we're going to give people the visibility of the health of their battery, so it's very very transparent. This has never been done before," he said.

The update will also allow users to disable the throttling feature on their device.

"If you don't want it, you can turn it off," Mr Cook said.

The tech giant was forced to come clean about the scheme after researchers exposed Apple over the iOS code late last year. But according to the iPhone-maker, it was all done in the name of better user experience.

"This feature's only intent is to prevent unexpected shutdowns so that the iPhone can still be used," the company's battery support page says.

But many consumers have claimed Apple was secretly using the tactic as a self-serving way to push customers towards upgrading to a new handset.

Mr Cook said he does not recommend turning off the throttling feature when the update rolls out.



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