CRAIG FOSTER
CRAIG FOSTER

WOMENS NATIONAL SOCCER LEAGUE PLANNED

By ADAM HICKS

A NATIONAL women's soccer league will be starting in Australia as early as next year, The Northern Star can reveal.

In an exclusive interview, former Socceroo and Kadina High School student, Craig Foster yesterday said Football Federation Australia (FFA) had made concrete plans for a league which would come on the back of the Matildas' best showing at the women's World Cup.

Foster said he would reveal more on the proposed league during SBS's live telecast of the Matildas' crucial clash with Canada tonight.

The Matildas need a draw to qualify for the quarter-finals after previously beating Ghana and drawing with competition heavyweights Norway.

"I understand there are plans for as early as next year for some form of women's national league to be re-established," Foster said.

"There are concrete plans for some form of league to give the Matildas a better platform to achieve in the future."

Foster said the plans couldn't have come at a better time.

"The Matildas have announced to Australia that they are a genuine national sporting team," he said.

"They're saying, 'We're here, look at us, we are a top-class team'," he said.

"They are adamant they want to put women's football on the map in this country."

Foster said that regardless of tonight's result, the Matildas had already been successful.

Before revealing the FFA's plans, Foster said he had talked to players from the Matildas' squad who had voiced desires for a national league in Australia.

"One of the things they are hoping for is for a women's national league to be re-established," he said.

"Playing against Norway, who are in the middle of a professional season ... they are at a disadvantage yet they are finishing games more strongly."



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