GLOOMY SHADOW: A supposed white pointer shark spotted at Clarkes Beach, Byron Bay last week.
GLOOMY SHADOW: A supposed white pointer shark spotted at Clarkes Beach, Byron Bay last week.

Surfers in a scurry

TESSA HOFFMAN A CLOSE encounter with a three-metre shark at a Byron Bay beach left Dominique Haenzi a little 'freaked out.' But it won't stop the Black Dog Surf School photographer from getting back in the water.

Dominique was working last Saturday at Clarkes Beach when he spotted a fin while in waist-high water with a small class.

"My first reaction was 'it's a dolphin' but then I realised 'no, that's no dolphin'," he said. "I told the students to walk out of the water slowly. "They were about five blokes from England and I thought they would panic, but they were cool."

Once out, Dominique said he followed the shark for a few metres in knee-deep water, before he thought it was 'too big for me' and then ran to warn other surfers at The Pass. "Most people got out of the water, but a few old locals kept surfing," he said.

Afterwards, Dominique showed his pictures around town and was told by most the fin probably belonged to a white pointer.

Cape Byron Marine Park Authority manager Andrew Page said it was uncommon to get sharks in such shallow water at Byron Bay.



Inventor reveals his work on shark detection technology

premium_icon Inventor reveals his work on shark detection technology

He took on Microsoft (and won), now he's taking on the shark issue

PM criticises Byron Bay's Australia Day change

PM criticises Byron Bay's Australia Day change

"Indulgent self-loathing does not make Australia stronger," he said

When 'looking scary' is your winning strategy for poker

premium_icon When 'looking scary' is your winning strategy for poker

Northern Rivers team prepares for Deaf Poker Australia championships

Local Partners