St Pat's deast fit for the Irish

By BREE PRICE

THE SMELL of frying bacon, potato and flour wafts throughout Dinah Manson's Pearces Creek home.

The Irish-born 82-year-old stands at her stove top and carefully prepares a traditional St Patrick's Day breakfast of potato bread and spud dough fried in bacon fat that has to be eaten first thing in the morning.

"It's so cold in Ireland you have to have a heavy breakfast," Mrs Manson said, in an Irish tweak that still lingers 60 years after she migrated with her Australian husband from Enniskillen, in north-western Ireland.

"You literally use a bucket of boiled potatoes and leave it to cook a long, long, long time.

"The family absolutely love it when I make it."

Mrs Manson said although she intended to have a quiet St Patrick's Day celebration with her son Peter today, it was always a huge day in Ireland.

"It's so hot nobody works and every town and city has a parade," she said.

"There are parties in all the pubs.

"I'll just listen to masses and masses of Irish music, that's what I'll do."

But don't offer Mrs Manson a pint of Guiness today, she can't stand it.

"I hate Guiness. Irish Whiskey straight, thanks," she said.



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