RARE FIND: The female Curviers Beaked Whale beached itself at the Pass, Byron Bay
RARE FIND: The female Curviers Beaked Whale beached itself at the Pass, Byron Bay

Mystery of Pass whale uncovered



SCIENTISTS have positively identified Byron Bay's mystery beached whale.

The 6.1 metre female whale found beached at the Pass last month, is a Cuviers Beaked Whale.

This is only the second time this species has been recorded stranding in NSW.

"Although it was difficult to immediately identify the animal, it has still raised considerable interest among whale researchers due to the extreme rarity of any species of beaked whale stranding," National Parks and Wildlife Service officer Lawrence Orel said.

The whale's species had been identified by Southern Cross University researchers using DNA sequencing.

"Although they have been recorded in other states, the only other positive record of a Cuviers whale stranding in NSW was in the Sydney region in 1885," Mr Orel said.

The female Byron Bay whale, weighing 1.8 tonnes, died shortly after washing ashore at the Pass at Byron, despite efforts to push her back out to sea.

A severe number of large kidney stones were found in the left kidney, and it appears most likely the animal died as a result of kidney failure.

The whale's body will now be studied as beaked whales are so rarely seen, little is known about them, Mr Orel said.

Cuviers Beaked Whales can grow to over seven metres in length.



'Our kids deserve it': $1 million skate park one step closer

'Our kids deserve it': $1 million skate park one step closer

It's taken many years and discussions to get to this point

Why our pets are the best mind readers

Why our pets are the best mind readers

Genuine instances of clever mental behaviour in the animal world

This festival is 'not for the sexually conservative'

This festival is 'not for the sexually conservative'

One of the workshops is titled Meditative Spanking For Pleasure

Local Partners