Bernadette Pollard at the Wyrallah Road property known as Tabletop with her sons Joey McDonnell, 7, and Angus McDonnell, 10. Th
Bernadette Pollard at the Wyrallah Road property known as Tabletop with her sons Joey McDonnell, 7, and Angus McDonnell, 10. Th

Family to sell property after 100 years

By ANDY PARKS andy.parks@northernstar.com.au A 75-HECTARE property on the outskirts of Lismore is up for grabs after being in the same family for more than 100 years.

John Pollard purchased '199 acres and 34 perchers' of land from Peter Thomas and Anne McDonald in 1901 for 1000 pounds, and it has been in the Pollard family ever since.

The property, known as Tabletop, was a dairy farm for most of that time until it was converted to beef in the late 1970s. It has a three-bedroom timber house that was rebuilt after its roof was blown off by a tornado in 1946.

"I was only six months old when the tornado hit. I was in my cot and my father was at the dairy," said Dianne O'Brien, one of the 11 grandchildren of John Pollard who is now selling the property.

"The house that's there now is the old worker's cottage," she said. "The original homestead burnt down it 1947." John Pollard had 11 children and the youngest, Hilary Clancy Pollard, bought the property from the rest of the family. He then had 11 children of his own. The ownership fell to his children when he died in 1978.

"It's time to move it on," said Bernadette Pollard, the youngest of the current owners. "We're scattered all around the country, no one lives around here any more."

Mrs Pollard said they didn't really know what it was worth today.

"It's a funny parcel of land. It's beautiful up on the ridge, and on the eastern side of Wyrallah Road it's zoned industrial."

Mrs Pollard said she lived at Tabletop until she finished school at 17 and says it was a great place to grow up.

Her sister Dianne said she remembered travelling to school in a sulky or riding on a pony, leaving after the milking was finished and returning home in time to help at the dairy in the afternoon.

"In the '50s and '60s the Broadwater bus made its final stop before Lismore to pick up the Pollard children.

"'Fordy's coming down Monaltrie Hill' was the cry at the kitchen window for the children, who were assembled on the side of the road," Dianne said in reference to legendary bus driver Arthur Ford, who took hundreds of children to school from farms at Wyrallah, Tuckie and Dungaruba.

The property is divided by Wyrallah Road and surrounds Lismore City Council's works depot, which was split off the original farm in the 1970s.

It has 12 hectares of land zoned for industrial use and boasts 660 metres of road frontage.

The rest is zoned 'investigation', meaning the site could potentially be used for purposes other then agricultural in the future.

Tenders for the property are open until December 6. For further information visit www.colliers.com/australia



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