STALWART: Brian Ison
STALWART: Brian Ison

Evans Head club enters surfing?s hall of fame

By JAMIE BROWN

sport@northernstar.com.au

EVANS Head's Half-Tide Boardriders Club has achieved what its founding fathers long regarded was impossible: They have entered surfing's hall of fame.

Last night, club president Kevin Aleckson and club stalwarts Brian Ison, Brian Cooksey, Simon Freeden and Peter Koskela travelled to the Surfing Australia complex at Casuarina Beach to accept the Simon Anderson Board Riders Club of the Year Award, with the winner inducted into the Australian Surfing Hall of Fame.

It was an emotional time for the core group, who accepted an award that has, in the past, been presented to the likes of big-name clubs Snapper Rocks, Kirra, Maroubra, Cronulla, Torquay and others.

While Half-Tide may not be ready, yet, to tackle the gun clubs in competition, the award for team spirit, community backbone and hard-core commitment to the local surfing scene.

According to Brian Ison, the man responsible for the club's submission, the award recognised all the people who made, and continued to make Half-Tide a success.

"It made me realise that all the effort over all the years to promote the sport of surfing at our local level has been worthy," he said.

Bearing in mind the community nature of the award, it's ironic that Half-Tide Boardriders Club was formed in the late 1960s as a direct result of the then local council attempting to ban boardriding at Main Beach, Evans Head.

nNorthern Star surfing correspondent Phil Roxburgh, himself a former president of the Half-Tide club, attended last night's award presentation. He will report on the night in The Northern Star on Saturday.



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