Lorraine Bridges (left), of Goonellabah, and Joy Wicks, of Alstonville, at their display with two of their many decorated eggs.
Lorraine Bridges (left), of Goonellabah, and Joy Wicks, of Alstonville, at their display with two of their many decorated eggs.

Decorated eggs are a constant source of Joy

By SAMANTHA TURNBULL

YOU won't find any bacon on the side with Joy Wicks's eggs.

The Alstonville woman views every uncracked egg as a potential work of art.

"I see an egg and I think 'I wonder what I can do with that?'" she said.

"Or I see an ornament and I think 'that would look nice inside an egg.'"

Mrs Wicks and her egg artistry companion, Lorraine Bridges of Goonellabah, were two of the 45 exhibitors at the weekend Alstonville/Wollongbar Quota Club Arts and Crafts Fair.

Their delicate creations ranged in price from $5 to $200, depending on the size and the effort put into the final design.

The pair get their eggs from duck, goose and ostrich farms, as well as the occasional emu.

Once they get an egg they prick holes in the top and bottom of the shell and blow through one side so the yolk falls out the other.

"Sometimes the farmer blows them for us," said Mrs Wicks.

"That's the easy part."

They then use a tiny blade to slice the egg in half and place an ornament inside, before painting and decorating the shell.

"I remember seeing a friend of mine decorating an egg and I thought 'I just have to do that,' because it looked so interesting," Mrs Wicks said.

"The shells are very fine, but you get to know how to handle them after a bit of practise."

Mrs Wicks and Mrs Bridges met at an egg artistry class at Beverley's Baubles and Beads in Lismore, and have had stalls at the Alstonville fair for the past two years.

"It's a social thing as well," Mrs Bridges said.

"Sometimes if we don't feel like decorating eggs we'll sit around and talk or we'll go out for lunch.

"But we love decorating eggs.

"Seeing your own designs on the eggs appeals to me."

The Alstonville/Wollongbar Quota Club Arts and Crafts Fair has been running for five years.

Other crafts on show included alpaca wool clothing, handmade lace, porcelain dolls, woodwork, beaded jewellery, folk art, embroidery and patchwork quilts.

Money raised from the fair will go mainly towards the Far North Coast Centre for Autism in Alstonville, the Ballina/Byron Bay Family Centre's Butterfly Children Project, and local breast cancer survivors' rowing club Northern Rivers Rainbow Dragons Abreast.

The Quota Club will decide what other charities to donate their extra profits to after th



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