Emileigh Rose Latte, aged 1, of Yorklea, often helps her dad choose which cattle to purchase.
Emileigh Rose Latte, aged 1, of Yorklea, often helps her dad choose which cattle to purchase.

Brisk bidding at Casino cattle sale

By Nerida Blok

Dry weather had Killarney cattleman Pat Boyle hesitant about bidding at Casino's 30th annual weaner and grower steer two-day sale, which started yesterday.

"I've got no brass and no grass," laughed Mr Boyle.

While Mr Boyle refrained from bidding at the George & Fuhrmann-run sale, there were plenty of buyers from New South Wales, Queensland and Victoria keen to purchase from the 4500 head on offer.

Coolah cattleman Michael Welsh said there were a large number of quality livestock to choose from.

"The cattle will sell pretty well, they are of outstanding quality," he predicted prior to the start of sale.

Mr Welsh, an old friend of Mr Boyle's, was invited up to Casino by George & Fuhrmann to judge the best Hereford pen of steers, which he awarded to the Boland family, of Coraki.

Despite the quality of cattle on offer yesterday, Mr Welsh said the dry weather had restricted demand.

"It's a funny old world," he said.

"Last year in January I was in Northern New South Wales and buyers were buying cattle in western Victoria and South Australia and then sending them north.

"Now, here today, cattle are being knocked down to go down to Naracorte, in South Australia ? it's a reverse, all in that short period of time."

George & Fuhrmann auctioneer Darren Perkins said while the dry weather did affect some of the sale prices in comparison to other years, overall yesterday's sale of 2000 head returned pleasing results.

"We grossed a bit over one million dollars from livestock to go under the hammer in two hours," Mr Perkins said.

He said the Boland family, of Coraki, topped yesterday's sale with their pen of weaner steers selling for $772. The Reid family, of Woodenbong, topped the pen of Hereford heifers at $530.

Mr Perkins said while producers geared themselves up for this sale each year, dry weather all over Australia meant the market was on a cheaper trend.

"A lot more people sell off surplus livestock because water is becoming a major issue," he said.

"Not just here, but also other areas like the New England region, and it's pushing market prices down.



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