AFRAID: Holli Clifford, 21, of Lismore Heights, is afraid to walk alone in the Lismore CBD at night.
AFRAID: Holli Clifford, 21, of Lismore Heights, is afraid to walk alone in the Lismore CBD at night.

ARE WE SAFE?

By BREE PRICE

AT THE end of a late waitressing shift, Holli Clifford folds her apron and collects her bag, but she doesn't leave a central Lismore cafe.

The 21 year old is too scared to walk alone to a taxi rank 100 metres away since the possible murder of German tourist Simone Strobel three weeks ago.

A police media spokesperson said they still could not say if Simone was murdered because toxicology and post-mortem results were not complete.

She said results were expected in 'a couple of weeks' and this was the usual time-frame.

There had been no increase in the number police patrols in Lismore, she said.

Simone, 25, went missing on February 11 after leaving the Lismore Tourist Caravan Park about 11pm for a walk. Her body was found almost a week later near the Lismore Continental Club in Uralba Street.

Holli is one of several young women who spoke to The Northern Star on Thursday night in Lismore about their fear for their personal safety after dark.

Without a driver's licence, Holli waits after every shift for a lift from a workmate or friend.

"Ever since that happened I won't step a foot outside the gate by myself. There's no way I would walk by myself at night," she said.

Holli said not knowing what happened to Simone only added to her fear.

"It scares me to think this girl could have been taken and killed and no-one knows anything," she said.

Holli said she had walked through Lismore about the time Simone disappeared and was still shaken by the incident.

"I finished work about 11.30pm and walked by myself to the taxi rank in front of Mary Gilhooley's," she said. "When I heard what happened I felt fear, complete fear.

"I went into town on the Monday (after) and it was broad daylight, but I was still scared. My boyfriend walked me to the bus stop."

Deanna Popp and Amy Shepherd, both 24, regularly enjoy a late-night drink in Lismore.

"I'd feel more comfortable if they found out who did it," Deanne said.

"We used to park our car out the back (of Mary Gilhooley's), but now we park right out the front because there are cameras on the roundabout and lots of people driving past," Deanne, of Tuncester, said.

Every Thursday night Amanda Galea, 16, and Cherokee Mundine, 15, join hundreds of other young 'coggers' in a car park on the corner of Dawson and Woodlark streets in Lismore, to show off their cars.

The car park is diagonally across from the Lismore Continental Club, where Simone Strobel's body was found.

"It's scary because it's so close. It's always in the back of your mind and you think twice before doing anything," Amanda said.

What do you

think?

Phone the Star Feedback line on 6624 3266 or email opin- ions@northernstar.com.au



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