A new draft plan of management seeks to create a joint management arrangement for the Julian Rocks reserve between the NPWS and the Arakwal people.
A new draft plan of management seeks to create a joint management arrangement for the Julian Rocks reserve between the NPWS and the Arakwal people.

Aboriginal link for Julian Rocks

JULIAN ROCKS is on its way to becoming the next Uluru.

The rocky outcrop, 2.5km off Byron Bay’s Main Beach, will be also known by its Aboriginal name Nguthungulli (pronounced Nuth-un-gully) if a draft plan of management for the area is adopted.

Arakwal Corporation spokeswoman Yvonne Stewart said Julian Rocks was a sacred Aboriginal landmark and its name should reflect that.

“The Bundjalung people are trying to get dual naming into areas of special significance,” she said. “It’s a way we can be recognised.”

Julian Rocks was not officially named until 1971. In 1883 it had been charted as Juan and Julia Islands, although it is unclear who Juan and Julia were.

Nguthungulli means ‘Father of the World’ and in the Aboriginal Dreamtime he was the creator of land, water, animals and plants. According to legend, Nguthungulli now rests in a cave at Julian Rocks.

If the plan of management is adopted by the NSW Department of Environment, the National Parks and Wildlife Service and the Arakwal people will apply to have the area formally renamed as the Julian Rocks Nguthungulli Nature Reserve.

The plan also seeks to create a joint management arrangement for the reserve between the NPWS and the Arakwal people.

The NPWS and Arakwal already co-manage a large chunk of land along the Byron coastline.

“It will be the same as what is happening now all through the Byron coast area,” Ms Stewart said.

“Julian Rocks has been identified as a significant Aboriginal place for a long time, so we thought it was time we got involved in managing that reserve to ensure its environmental and cultural protection.”

Ms Stewart said recreational use of the water surrounding the rocks would not change.

“The plan talks about the rock itself, and nobody goes on the rock anyway,” she said.

“This won’t effect anybody scuba diving or using the water.”

The plan is on public exhibition until March 29 next year.

Comment on the plan can be made at www.environment.nsw.gov.au



"Someone could have been injured or killed"

premium_icon "Someone could have been injured or killed"

An RFS crew sheltered in their truck as the grass fire overcame them

How this Ballina mum juggles kids and a thriving business

premium_icon How this Ballina mum juggles kids and a thriving business

"Kids are amazing but... having a passion is fulfilling as well”

Local Partners