Spectators watch great horsemanship at the show.
Spectators watch great horsemanship at the show.

A show of horsemanship at Kyogle

AT THE heart of the Kyogle Show is an impressive display of some of Australia's finest campdrafting riders and horses.

The campdraft and stockhorse challenge has attracted about 120 riders, competing for a spot in the finals.

Judge Peter Hiscocks said Northern NSW and southern Queensland were some of strongest areas in Australia for competition campdrafting.

"Some of the best horsemen in Australia come out of the North Coast district," he said.

"If you want to try yourself out and try your horse out this is a great area to come.

"These guys earn their living doing this.

"The people that are here today are what I consider the real Australian horsepeople."

Chaylee Bruyn, four and her brother Connor, three of Warwrick, at the Kyogle Annual Show at the Kyogle Showgrounds.
Chaylee Bruyn, four and her brother Connor, three of Warwrick, at the Kyogle Annual Show at the Kyogle Showgrounds. Marc Stapelberg

Mallanganee cattle farmer Ron Dean, who has been coming to the Kyogle Show for 30 years, has made it into the campdraft finals on his horse Twinkle.

Mr Dean said he had been working with cattle and horses all his life and loved the "challenge of getting a horse going and keeping them going."

In campdrafting, riders aim to "cut out" a beast from the heard in the cattle yard and turn it at least two or three times to show control.

The beast is then herded out of the yard and into the arena where it is taken through a figure eight course in less than 40 seconds.

The stockhorse challenge is a combination of the campdraft and dry work, where riders get a chance to "show off" their skills and horse by cracking the whip, going over jumps, opening gates and executing tight turns after galloping.

Mr Hiscocks said he would be looking today for well educated, athletic, pliable horses that the riders can put easily into position.

Kyogle show president Allan Tindall said the number of entries in the campdrafting had been a lot more than organisers anticipated.

He said between 1500 and 2000 people were expected through the gates.

Julie Wardell, of Kiama, with her prize-winning dog Jade.
Julie Wardell, of Kiama, with her prize-winning dog Jade.

 

Young face on an ancient breed makes grand champion pooch

PEKINGESE pooch Jade is the youngest supreme grand champion in Australia.

He is one of the more than 1500 pampered pooches on display at this year's Kyogle show.

The dogs are being judged over four days by experts who have flown in from all over the world.

Jade's owner, Julie Wardell, who has travelled from Kiama (on the NSW south coast) for the show, said her dog's wide jaw, big eyes and broad face made him a canine champion.

She said Pekingese was an ancient breed of toy dog originating in China.

"They were the emperor's dogs and they know it," she said. "They're very up themselves.

"They're not an obedient breed. They're royalty and they just do their own thing."

Also known as the Peking Lion Dog, Jade's mane is a lot to manage.

When he's not at shows, Jade has the long fur from his ears, tail and hind legs wrapped in plastic so it doesn't tangle.

Yvonne Taylor's Shetland sheepdog Stella took out "best of breed" yesterday.

Based in Diamond Beach, near Forster, Ms Taylor said she enjoyed Kyogle.

"It's really friendly," she said. "They've tried really hard with the grounds and it's only going to get better."



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