READY TO ROLL: Nicholas Carey, Charlie Llewellyn and Gabriel Da Silva Ferreira from St Mary’s Primary School, Casino at the Lismore Eisteddfod Schools Day at Lismore Workers Club.
READY TO ROLL: Nicholas Carey, Charlie Llewellyn and Gabriel Da Silva Ferreira from St Mary’s Primary School, Casino at the Lismore Eisteddfod Schools Day at Lismore Workers Club. Doug Eaton

Last day of Eisteddfod leaves everyone aflutter

THERE were kids in crocodile costumes on stage and hundreds of others in the audience with their hair and make-up done, clutching bags or boxes with their costumes.

It was the final day of the Lismore Eisteddfod Schools Day program, which caps four days of singing, dancing and music making.

The annual program put on by the Lismore Music Festival Society is now in its 101st year and featured 17 schools from across the region.

Adjudicating the performances was Melissa Phillip from Toowoomba, who was given the unenviable task of picking winners among all the colour and movement.

One of the event organisers, Val Axtens, said it was an "historic event" and something that gave kids an opportunity to showcase their creative talents.

Throughout September the eisteddfod continues with the vocal, piano and instrumental program as well as a full program of dancing.



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