Tania Rendle plays board games with her daughter Charlize 9yrs and her friend Chiara 9yrs. Picture: Ian Currie
Tania Rendle plays board games with her daughter Charlize 9yrs and her friend Chiara 9yrs. Picture: Ian Currie

9 good things to come from coronavirus pandemic

WE DO not want to downplay the seriousness of the current state of affairs in Australia.

COVID-19 has been devastating for the economy, for business, for those who have fallen ill and families experiencing domestic violence.

However as the adage goes, every dark cloud has a silver lining.

Let's take some time to reflect on the positives - I would love to hear yours via the comments section.

1. It has sparked a gardening revolution

Local garden shops have been overwhelmed with keen gardeners and those interested in starting a veggie patch in a bid to become less reliant on the supermarkets for fresh produce.

GOING GREEN: Lismore Garden Centre owner Emma Barnes and staff member Oli Blyth have been kept busy as veteran and new gardeners flocked to purchase vegetable seeds, seedlings, fruit trees, compost and potting mix to grow their own fresh food.
GOING GREEN: Lismore Garden Centre owner Emma Barnes and staff member Oli Blyth have been kept busy as veteran and new gardeners flocked to purchase vegetable seeds, seedlings, fruit trees, compost and potting mix to grow their own fresh food.

2. We are getting to know our neighbours

Now we are home more often, we are bumping into our neighbours, and having the chance to get to know them. It's lovely - our neighbour returned from a fishing trip last week and shared a massive haul of mackerel with us.

3. Family reunification

Unfortunately many young adults have been forced to move back with their parents, who were empty nesters. While we all love our independence I know of a few local parents who are delighted to be reunited with their adult kids. Households are playing board games and spending quality time together.

4. Rolling out of bed to work

This clearly doesn't apply to our valient medical staff and supermarket workers, but for people like myself who are now able to work from home, I am saving money on fuel, reducing my impact on the environment and saving time by cutting the daily drive from Ballina to Goonellabah.

5. We are cooking every night

We don't want to risk anyone's health by going out for takeaway, so we have been cooking every night. It's more affordable and we are trying new things - the new cookbook is getting a workout.

Yes I took my dog for a walk at The Spit Ballina during my lunch break and I LOVED it!
Yes I took my dog for a walk at The Spit Ballina during my lunch break and I LOVED it!

6. I am looking after myself

Working from home allows me to meditate at lunch, or to dive into the ocean for a quick swim or surf (while social distancing). This would not be possible from the office.

7. People are being smarter with their money

This crisis has forced many of us to look into our finances, budget, and spend more carefully.

8. Local businesses are innovating

Whether they are offering new delivery services, or delivering their services online, we are amazed at what local businesses are doing to survive this tough time.

9. Local musos are stepping it up

Entertainers are doing what they do best online. Local acts like Varietyville, Mullum Uke Online, Sean and Aine Tyrrell and Pajamas are livestreaming their music this week, check out their Facebook pages for details.



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