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Hip-hop's good for the soul

Hip-hop dancers (from left) Phaedra Craig, Jemma Wason-Brim and Kirsty Williams all from Queensland are taking part in a Beats and Roots National Hip Hop Summit.
Hip-hop dancers (from left) Phaedra Craig, Jemma Wason-Brim and Kirsty Williams all from Queensland are taking part in a Beats and Roots National Hip Hop Summit. Jacklyn Wagner

HIP-hop music can help marginalised young people find their voice, Creative Peoples Collective secretary Nadine Smith said.

Creative Peoples Collective in Lismore has organised the first-ever Beats and Roots National Hip Hop Summit and Youth Leadership Conference to be held on the Northern Rivers April 26-29.

Hip-hop skills workshops and panel discussions will be held at Multitask in Lismore on Thursday (April 26) and Friday (April 27). Several local participants will be chosen to perform alongside renowned hip-hop artists, including Busty Beatz and Candy B, at Lismore City Hall on Friday night (April 27).

"Hip-hop is about being a voice for the oppressed and displaced people, and certainly that is something young people relate to," Ms Smith said.

"What comes out of young people in these workshops can really be quite profound lyrics and messages. It's not just about the performances and workshops; it's about getting young people to talk about social issues."

Social activist and Sydney-based musician Morganics will conduct a hip-hop masterclass at the Youth Activity Centre in Byron Bay on Sunday (April 29).

He has taught hip-hop in jails and remote Aboriginal communities around Australia.

"Anybody who wants to use hip-hop for community projects or to create different social outcomes should come and see Morganics because he's really experienced at that sort of thing," Ms Smith said.

She also said the Beats and Roots National Hip Hop Summit and Youth Leadership Conference will give young people the opportunity to interact with positive role models.

"It's not just about providing industry-level role models but peer role models as well. It's a big thing to put your ideas out there, so it's really good for them (young people) to see other people doing it."

Tickets to Morganics' masterclass in Byron Bay cost $20 and a two-day pass to the Lismore workshops is $80.

Topics:  hip hop, music, workshops




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