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Gina gets your yearly wage in 28 mins

IF you hate your job, it's probably best you stop reading now.

A website dedicated to helping billionaire "underdogs" has developed a calculator that helps visitors to the site work out how long it would take them to earn the net worth of Australian mining magnates Gina Rinehart, Andrew "Twiggy" Forrest and Clive Palmer.

The site also calculates how long it would take that trio to earn your annual salary.

And here's where it gets ugly.

It would take a person earning $70,000 a year - which is roughly the average salary in Australia - 56,000 years to earn Mr Palmer's net worth.

No, that's not a misprint - 56,000 years.

Conversely, it takes Mr Palmer, the man who plans to bring you Titanic 2, just 70.8 minutes to earn $70,000.

>>How do you stack up? Check out the calculator here.

It gets uglier.

Ms Rinehart? Well, it takes her just 28.8 minutes to rake in $70,000.

And if you've got a spare 67,857 years you too could earn her net wealth.

But it gets even uglier.

Mr Forrest needs only 20 minutes to make a measly $70k, but the average Australian worker earning the same amount would need 6057 decades to match his net worth.

Of course the lower your annual salary, the more depressing it gets.

Fair Go For Billionaires describes itself as being a "not-for-profit organisation dedicated to helping the underdog".

"And if you ignore the billions of dollars in cold hard cash we've got in our bank accounts, billionaires are the quintessential underdog. We're the forgotten few, and picked on just because we earned (or inherited) a few measly billion dollars and now the government expects us to give a hand and help out our fellow Australians. It's un-Australian," the site explains.

Of course it's created in the name of satire, and on that front it succeeds.

It has a section dedicated to the "facts" about mining in Australia, proclaiming: "The only people who should benefit from the mining boom are the people who are already benefiting."

The group also expresses its desire to give the "other side of the story".

"You've all seen the government ads where guys in torn, dusty overalls and their crying children talk about how they're going to lose their jobs if the government doesn't start taxing the rich," the site proclaims.

"We've got problems too - do you have any idea how hard it is to find a pilot who can land a helicopter on a yacht at 3am after an absinthe and lobster bisque bender in Paris? Near bloody impossible."

If you feel like having a laugh, the site is well worth a look.

But be warned: using the wealth calculator could cause the user to become light-headed and nauseous. Avoid operating heavy machinery after using it - unless, of course, you're a cashed-up mine worker.

How do you stack up? Check out the calculator here.

Topics:  andrew forrest, clive palmer, gina rinehart, mining




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