Lifestyle

Street Rodders' swap meet a treasure trove of old bits

GOOD TIMES: Borderline Street Rodders members Kevin Boyd, left, and Peter Nielsen at their club’s swap meet at the Lismore Showgrounds at the weekend. They are pictured with Mr Boyd’s 1946 Ford Freighter.
GOOD TIMES: Borderline Street Rodders members Kevin Boyd, left, and Peter Nielsen at their club’s swap meet at the Lismore Showgrounds at the weekend. They are pictured with Mr Boyd’s 1946 Ford Freighter. Luke Mortimer

TO THE uninitiated, Borderline Street Rodders swap meet at the Lismore Showground may as well have resembled a sodden wrecking yard.

But to those in the know, Sunday's meet presented a veritable treasure trove of niche automotive parts and go-fast bits up for grabs.

However, as Borderline member Peter Nielsen noted, rekindling friendships forged under the bonnet of classic cars was the real reason many members attended the annual meet.

"All the club members always get right into it, help out and it usually goes very well," Mr Nielsen, owner of a 1934 Ford Coupe, said.

"You tend to make a lot of friends over the years."

Mr Nielsen said he was pleased to see younger generations embracing automotive clubs, even though they tend to focus on newer makes and models.

"This is for all motoring enthusiasts, whether you've got a Japanese modern car or drift car or whatever else. If they want parts, they come here, usually scratch around and find it," he said.

"This used to be all vintage car parts, but they're getting more and more scarce and it's slowly evolving into more modern parts."

Mr Nielsen pointed out that Bob Trevan, who he said has one of the largest Ford Model T collections in the world, had a stall set up at the meet.

Kevin Boyd, a club member of 22 years, brought his restored 1946 Ford Freighter along to the meet, which he'd spent three years part-time restoring.

Like many car enthusiasts, he loves pumping resources into his treasured ride, but admitted it can be a little draining.

"You do enjoy working on it, but you get a bit sick of it sometimes," he said.

"It's always worth it though when you've got it finished, registered and you're driving it."

Mr Boyd said he was part of the club due to the "mateship and likeminded people".

Topics:  cars, motoring




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