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Red Nose makes a fun day with a deadly serious mission

NINE children under the age of four die suddenly and unexpectedly every day in Australia from causes including sleeping accidents, drowning, motor vehicle accidents, sudden onset illness, SIDS and stillbirth.

So today, put on a red nose and help raise awareness with Red Nose Day.

Safe sleeping tips for parents of young children

National Fundraising, marketing and communications manager, Yvonne Amos said the reason why Red Nose Day is still so important after almost 30 years is that there still is no known cause for Sudden Infant Death Syndrome, so there's no known cure.

"Babies and children are still dying from sleeping problems," Ms Amos said.

RAISING AWARENESS: Bradlee Commins, three, of Goonellabah gets into the spirit of Red Nose Day.
RAISING AWARENESS: Bradlee Commins, three, of Goonellabah gets into the spirit of Red Nose Day. Marc Stapelberg

The Red Nose Day team, she said, works with health professionals to bring out the message of safe sleeping practices and to raise money for awareness and research into the cause.

It's important for parents to know about safe sleeping practices and the key messages that Red Nose Day try to send, she said.

You can head to rednoseday.com.au for full information about safe sleeping practices.

"Safe sleeping's not about having an expensive cot or an expensive mattress, it's about understanding what constitutes a safe sleeping environment," Ms Amos said.

You can get involved in Red Nose Day by buying a red nose or a t-shirt from Target, Big W, Supercheap Auto, or a Terry White Chemist.

Snap a photo of yourself in your Red Nose Day nose or t-shirt and post it on Instagram or Facebook with one of the following hashtags: #rednosedayaus #rednoseway #rednosedaytshirt

Bradlee Commins (3), of Goonellabah, gets into the spirit of Red Nose Day. Photo Marc Stapelberg / The Northern Star
Bradlee Commins (3), of Goonellabah, gets into the spirit of Red Nose Day. Photo Marc Stapelberg / The Northern Star Marc Stapelberg

Sleeping safely

Do:

  • Place baby on back to sleep from birth.
  • Sleep baby with face and head uncovered.
  • Dress baby in clothing appropriate for weather.

Don't:

  • Sleep baby on tummy or side in any environment
  • Leave baby surrounded by loose bedding, toys and clothing.
  • Enclose a pram or stroller with a full covering.
  • Sleep baby on a tri pillow, bean bag or hammock.

Topics:  red nose day




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