Lifestyle

Allen's cuts Killer Python lollies in half to save the nation

IT'S either a breakthrough in efforts to improve the health of the nation or political correctness gone mad.

Either way, the Killer Python lollies you've known for so long - those giant multi-coloured snake-shaped strings of gelatine, sugar and food colouring - are gone.

In their place, Nestle, the company that owns the Allen's brand, has introduced a half-sized Killer Python containing a little over half the kilojoules of its lamented 47 gram monster.

Nestle says the change is part of a move to reduce serve sizes for lollies and help Australians better manage their health.

And this is only the beginning...

"We're now offering confectionery with responsibly sourced ingredients, on-pack portion education and changes such as revised portion sizes and resealable packaging," Nestle's general manager - confectionary, Martin Brown, was quoted saying in a statement from the company.

Would you prefer your Killer Python lollies smaller?

This poll ended on 13 October 2014.

Yes - they're just too much lolly to handle - 8%

No - I want to feel the sugar rush! - 81%

Maybe, but only if they're covered in chocolate first - 9%

This is not a scientific poll. The results reflect only the opinions of those who chose to participate.

"It's part of helping people improve their nutrition, health and wellness, and underlines our fundamental belief that for a company to be successful, it must also create value for society."

A dietician quoted in the statement, Malanie McGrice said one key benefit for parents is children given one of the new Killer Pythons would be able to get the sugar hit out of their systems faster.

"A 10 year old can now run off a Killer Python in around 30 minutes. With the previous size, it would have taken almost an hour," she said.

"Experience working as a dietitian has shown me that telling people to cut all treat foods out of their diet is unrealistic and unachievable in the long term.  A truly happy and healthy life comes through balance."

Ms McGrice said the smaller portion sizes would help people lead healthier lives.

"From my experience people often can't judge serving sizes," she was quoted saying.

"The portion guidance device clearly illustrates serving size and helps people enjoy their food, but know when to stop." 
 

Topics:  diet, editors picks, food, lollies, nestle




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